August 19 2017

Revolutionary War

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1775 – 1783 Revolutionary War

Chronology of Events Regular type= Crown victory. Bold type= Rebel victory. Italic type= non-confrontational event or non-decisive battle. Prelude to War 1760 to 1775 1760 King George III ascends to the throne of England. 1763 Treaty signed between England and France ending the French and Indian War. Canada and the continent east of the Mississippi River added to Great Britain's ...
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/ Military / War, Revolutionary War

2nd Virginia Regiment

LINEAGE [Wright, Continental Army, pp. 283-285] Authorized 21 August 1775 in the Virginia State Troops as the 2d Virginia Regiment Organized 21 October 1775 at Williamsburg to consist of seven companies Adopted 1 November 1775 into the Continental Army Reorganized 11 January 1776 to consist of ten companies Assigned 27 February 1776 to the Southern Department Relieved 27 December 1776 ...
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Captain Samuel Martin

Excerpt from Sketches of Western North Carolina, Cyrus L. Hunter, 1877 CAPTAIN SAMUEL MARTIN Captain Samuel Martin was a native of Ireland, and born in the year 1732. When a young man, he emigrated to America, and first settled in Pennsylvania. After remaining a short time in that State, he joined the great tide of emigration to the southern colonies ...
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Captain Samuel Martin at King’s Mountain

RESEARCHER'S NOTES: Participation of Captain Samuel Martin in the Battle of King's Mountain. During the latter part of August and the whole of September, Captain Martin was rarely at home, and then not remaining for more than two days at a time. About the last week of September be marched with his company by a circuitous route, under Colonel Graham, ...
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Cowpens

(1781) The Loyalist defeat at King's Mountain two month earlier had revived the Patriot effort for the war in the South. The Army had a new Southern Department commander in the Quaker Nathaniel Greene. Greene was determined to fight, but not at the expense of loosing more men. He made the decision that he would wear the British down, then ...
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Guilford Courthouse

(1781) Despite the fact the Battle of Guilford Court House is a tactile draw, it remains a victory for the Americans as the British have been worn down so much that they will make a fateful retreat to Yorktown, Virginia. The tide of the war in the South has turned with Daniel Morgans' crushing defeat of Banaster Tarlton at the ...
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Overmountain Men

History In the summer of 1780, the Southern American colonies - and hopes of independence - seemed at the mercy of an invading British army. Believing the Southern colonies mostly loyal, the Royal army planned to conquer the South and recruit Loyalist militia (local volunteer soldiers) to help British regulars and British Provincial troops defeat the Continental Army and the ...
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Southern Campaign

The British Strategy By 1778, British and American combatants in the north were stalemated, and a quick end to the Revolutionary War was doubtful. The British now rekindled a plan for putting down the rebellion by first controlling the southern colonies and then sweeping north to total victory. The strategy began well. Savannah was captured in late 1778, and Charleston ...
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The Battle of Camden

(1780) The battle of Camden, South Carolina was a stunning defeat for the American Army. However the battle of Camden did effectively remove the politically appointed General Hortio Gates, and place the new General Nathaniel Greene, a man Washington had hoped would replace him should anything befall the Commander in Chief. Horatio Gates, the victor of Saratoga, had assumed command ...
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The Battle of Kings Mountain

On October 7, 1780, in the rolling hills of northern South Carolina, a small army of men under the command of a British officer, Major Patrick Ferguson, was overtaken and defeated by a group that had been assembled from the farms and fields of southwest Virginia, North Carolina and the area that would become Tennessee. The American colonists had been ...
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