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February 2 2015

Alabama Reserve Regiments

 

RESERVE REGIMENTS AND BATTALIONS INFANTRY.

SIXTY-SECOND, SIXTY-THIRD AND SIXTY-FIFTH REGIMENTS.

There were about nine regiments and three battalions of reserves, composed for the most part of very young men, about two regiments being made up of old men, and they were organized principally for the defense of Mobile and the bay forts. Some of these were, in 1864, consolidated under the command of Col. Daniel Huger, of the First reserve regiment, and the new regiment was known as the Sixty-second Alabama. Others, under Col. Olin F. Rice, of the Second reserve regiment, were known as the Sixty-third. The First battalion, also called the Fourth reserve regiment, was consolidated with the Third and Fourth battalions under Lieut.-Col. E. M. Underhill, and called the Sixty-fifth Alabama; it was employed mainly in the defenses of Mobile, though a detachment was sent to Montgomery in April, 1865, and retired before Wilson’s army to Girard, where it fought with severe loss and was captured. The Sixty-second and Sixty-third fought in General Thomas’ brigade at Fort Gaines and Spanish Fort, losing a large number in killed and wounded. Relieved at Spanish Fort by Holtzclaw’s brigade, they were sent to Blakely, where, after enduring the privations and perils of the siege of Blakely, they were captured, and were exchanged a few days before the final surrender of the department of the Gulf. Captain Johnson, of the Sixty-third, was killed, and Captain Ward, of the Sixty-second, wounded, at Spanish Fort. Capt. J. W. Pitts, who assisted in the defense of Talladega during Rousseau’s raid, became major of the Sixty-second. This regiment, composed wholly of young men, was especially complimented by General Liddell for gallant conduct at Spanish Fort.

EXTRACTS FROM OFFICIAL WAR RECORDS.

  • First Reserve Regiment, Col. Daniel E. Huger: No. 74–(975) Major Walthall says: “Captain Pitts’ company of boys on post duty at Talladega, July 13 to 15, 1864.” (977) Major Walthall, in his report of operations, July 13th to 15th, says: “Captain Pitts’ company required for duty at the bridge at Talladega, Rousseau’s raid.” No. 78–(814) September 3, 1864, under Col. Daniel E. Huger, in Liddell’s brigade, Mobile. No. 79, No. 93, No. 94–In Thomas’ command, Mobile, November and December, 1864 No. 101–(681) First and Second Reserves, home guards, in and about Mobile, January, 1865, 1,000 strong. No. 103–(831) February 16, 1865, at Mobile. Union report says: “A regiment of boys, about 600 strong, commanded by Colonel Withers (Huger).” (1045) March 10th, transferred from Taylor’s command to Thomas’. (1046) March 10th, in Thomas’ brigade, Mobile. No. 104 –(226) April 4, 1865, in Thomas’ brigade.
  • Second Reserve Regiment, Col. Olin F. Rice: No. 78 –(814) September 3, 1864, Col. Olin F. Rice, in Liddell’s brigade, district of the Gulf. No. 79–(876) November 1, 1864, Fuller’s command, district of the Gulf. No. 94–(633) December 1, 1864, Fuller’s command, department of Alabama, Mississippi and East Louisiana. No. 101–(681) First and Second Alabama Reserves, home guards, 1,000 strong, January, 1865, at Mobile. No. 103–(264) April 8, 1865, Fort Blakely, Ala.; 15 killed, 42 wounded. (1045) March 10th, transferred from Taylor’s command to Thomas’. (1046) Lieut.-Col. Junius A. Law, in Thomas’ brigade, Mobile. No. 104–(226) April, 1865, in Thomas’ brigade, Mobile.
  • Third Reserve Regiment, Col. William M. Brooks: No. 78–(814) September 3, 1864, Col. William M. Brooks, Thomas’ brigade, district of Gulf. (887) September 30th, Thomas’ brigade, department of Alabama, Mississippi and East Louisiana. No. 79–(901) Ordered to report to the commanding officer at Cahaba. (915) November 12, 1864, ordered to report to General Adams. No. 93–(1233) Six companies at Cahaba; Lieut.-Col. Samuel Jones. (1239) November 22d, ordered to Selma. (1244) November 24th, ordered to Pollard. No. 94–(634) December 1st, in Clanton’s brigade. Six companies at Cahaba. No. 103–(968) February 17, 1865, Third Alabama Reserves ordered to report to General Adams at <cmh7a_233>Selma, relieved at Mobile. (1045-1047) March 10th, Clanton’s brigade, Mobile. No. 104–(364) Mentioned as at Montgomery, April 15, 1865.
  • First Reserve Battalion, Lieut.-Col. W. M. Stone (became Fourth Reserves): No. 78–(814, 887) September, 1864, Thomas’ brigade, district of Mobile. No. 93–(1233) Called Fourth Alabama reserves, in Col. T. H. Taylor’s command at Mobile, November 20, 1864. No. 94–(634) Same assignment as above, December 1, 1864. No. 103–(968) February 10, 1865, Fourth Reserves relieved at Mobile and ordered to report to General Adams at Montgomery. No. 104–(364) Mentioned as at Montgomery, April 15, 1865.
  • Third Reserve Battalion, Capt. F. S. Strickland: No. 78–(814) September 3, 1864, in Liddell’s brigade, district of the Gulf, at Mobile. No. 79–(875) November 1st, in Baker’s brigade, Liddell’s division, Maury’s army. No. 93–(1233) November 20th, detached from district of the Gulf with Fourth battalion, under Lieut.-Col. E. M. Underhill. No. 94–(633) December 1, 1864, with Fourth battalion, Baker’s brigade.
  • Fourth Reserve Battalion: No. 79–(875) November l, 1864, Baker’s brigade, district of the Gulf, Mobile. No. 93–(1233) November 20th, Taylor’s brigade, Mobile, with Third battalion, under Lieut.-Col. E. M. Underhill. No. 94–(633) December 1, 1864, same assignment, Baker’s brigade.
  • First Junior Reserves Regiment: No. 103–(997) February 20, 1865, 330 for duty at Mobile.
  • Second Junior Reserves Regiment: No. 103–(997) February 20, 1865, 428 for duty at Mobile.
  • Third Senior Reserve Battalion: No. 103–(997) February 20, 1865, six companies at Pollard, one company Senior Reserves cavalry at Mobile; two companies Senior Reserves light artillery at Mobile. (998) Third Senior Reserves at Montevallo, February 20, 1865.
  • Fourth Senior Reserves: No. 103–(998) February 20, 1865, 150 for duty at Montgomery.
  • State Reserves. No. 78–(751) August 3, 1864, Colonel Patron’s command reinforced by 388 Alabama State Reserve troops, Mobile, Ala. No. 86–(911) In Mobile on city defenses. Report of Maj. F. W. Marston, chief signal officer, December 22, 1864. No. 93–(1233) Under Lieut.-Col. Young L. Royston, at Selma, November 20, 1864. No. 104–(226) In Maury’s command, Mobile, April, 1865.
February 2 2015

12th Alabama Infantry Regiment – Official Records

  THE TWELFTH ALABAMA INFANTRY.

The Twelfth Alabama infantry was organized at Richmond, July, 1861, formed a part of General Ewell’s brigade, and was afterward under General Rodes. It fought at ‘Yorktown, April 5 to May 3, 1862; Williamsburg, May 5th; Seven Pines, May 31st to June 1st, where it made a gallant assault upon the strong position held by Casey’s division; was engaged in the fights before Richmond, June 26th to July 1st; was distinguished at Boonsboro, September 15th, and Sharpsburg, September 17th; fought gallantly at Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862; Chancellorsville, May 1st to 4th; Brandy Station, June 9th; and Gettysburg, July 1st to 3d, and formed  part of the rear guard in retiring from that bloody field. It was also in the engagements at the Wilderness, May 5 to 7, 1864; Spottsylvania, May 8th to 18th; Winchester, July 24th, and in the various battles around Petersburg from June, 1864, to April, 1865.

Among the distinguished officers killed were: Col. Robert T. Jones, Capts. R. H. Keeling and C. A. Darwin at Seven Pines; Col. Bristow B. Gayle at Boonsboro; Capts. E. Tucker and D. H. Garrison at Sharpsburg; Henry W. Cox at Chancellorsville; Davis at Gettysburg; J. McCassells at the Wilderness; John Rogers at Spottsylvania, and A. Majors at Snicker’s Gap, August 19, 1864. Among the other field officers of this regiment were: Col. Samuel B. Pickens, Lieut.-Col. Theodore O’Hara, John C. Goodgame, and Edward D. Tracy, afterward killed when brigadier-general; also Majs. Adolph Proskaner and John C. Brown.

EXTRACTS FROM OFFICIAL WAR RECORDS.

  • Vol. II–(1000) Assigned to Second brigade, Gen. R. S. Ewell, First corps, army of Potomac, special order 169, Manassas Junction, July 25, 1861.
  • Vol. V–(1029) In Rodes’ brigade, Van Dorn’s division, Potomac district, General Beauregard commanding, January, 1862.
  • Vol. XI–(971-976) General Rodes’ report of battle of Seven Pines, May 31st to June 1st, speaks of Col. R. T. Jones of the Twelfth Alabama, killed, as the most accomplished officer in the brigade. For gallantry he notes Capt. E. Tucker, and gives casualties, 59 killed, 149 wounded. (979) Mentioned in report of Col. J. B. Gordon, Seven Pines. (981, 982) Col. B. B. Gayle, lieuten-ant-colonel commanding at Seven Pines, says that the Twelfth regiment, while advancing, charged directly through the camp of the enemy. The number of men carried into the fight, as near as can be ascertained, 408; number killed, 69; number wounded, 156. Thus, more than half carried into battle were killed or wounded.
  • Vol. XI, Part 2–(484) Rodes’ brigade, Hill’s division, Jackson’s corps, Seven Days’ battles. (505, 975) Medical <cmh7a_95>director reports 1 killed, 11 wounded at Gaines’ Mill. (555, 570, 621, 625) Mentioned in reports of Stonewall Jackson, Gen. C. Winder, Gen. Bradley Johnson, Gen. D. H. Hill, Seven Days’ battles. (630-633) Mentioned in report of Gen. R. E. Rodes. (634, 638, 639) Mentioned in reports of Col. J. B. Gordon and Col. B B. Gayle.
  • Vol. XI, Part 3–(482, 532, 601, 650) 550 strong, Peninsula campaign. Col. B. B. Gayle commanding regiment, July 23, 1862.
  • Vol. XIX, Part I–(261, 302) Mentioned in Federal reports of battles of South Mountain and Antietam. (808) Same assignment, Maryland campaign. Col. B. B. Gayle and Lieut.-Col. S. B. Pickens with regiment. (1021-1030) Gen. D. H. Hill, in report of operations July 23 to September 17, 1862, calls Colonel Gayle a most gallant and accomplished officer. (1034-1038) Report of General Rodes, battles of Boonsboro and Sharpsburg. The Twelfth lost heavily. Lieut.-Col. B. B. Gayle was seen to fall, and Lieut.-Col. Samuel B. Pickens was shot through the lungs; the former was left on the field supposed to be dead; Pickens was brought off.
  • Vol. XXI–(541, 1073) Rodes’ brigade, Second corps, army of Northern Virginia, battle of Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862. Lieut.-Col. S. B. Pickens in command of regiment.
  • No. 39–(792, 807) Assignment as above, Chancellorsville campaign. Medical director reports 14 killed and 77 wounded. (944-946) General Rodes calls attention to gallant and meritorious conduct of Colonel Pickens at Chancellorsville. (948, 951, 954, 955, 959, 960) Mentioned in reports of Col. E. A. O’Neal, Col. J. M. Hall and Col. J. N. Lightfoot. (960-964) Report of Colonel Pickens gives 6 killed and 32 wounded, May 2d, and 7 killed and 55 wounded, May 3d. Total loss at Chancellorsville, 14 killed and 87 wounded. (986) Gen. Alfred Iverson in report of Chancellorsville says: “I then communicated with Col. S. B. Pickens, commanding Twelfth Alabama, whose gallantry on this occasion I cannot too highly commend, so completely and courageously did he lend himself to aid me preparing the line to resist an attack.” (1053) Roll of honor, Chancellorsville: Capt. H. W. Cox, Company B, killed in action; Sergt. William Lawless, Company C; Privates Louis Dondero, Company A; R. W. May, Company B; J. E. Bailey, Company D; C. H. Hunter, <cmh7a_96>Company E; P. W. Chappell, Company E; R. B. Mitchell, Company G; W. S. Brown, Company H; H. N. Wooten, Company I; Thomas H. Eady, Company K.
  • No. 44–(287) Assignment as above, Gettysburg. (332, 342) Reports of casualties. (545-553) Mentioned in report of General Rodes. (563) Officers in command at Gettysburg: CoL S. B. Pickens, Maj. A. Proskaner, Lieut.-Col. J. C. Goodgame in command of the Twenty-sixth Alabama. (592-3) Mentioned in report of E. A. O’Neal, colonel commanding brigade. (600, 601) Colonel Pickens reports 12 killed and 71 wounded, Gettysburg.
  • No. 48–(399) Battle’s brigade, Second army corps, Colonel Pickens commanding regiment, September 30, 1863. (412, 617) Return of casualties, 2 killed, October 10th to 21st, October 20th to November 8th, 1 wounded. (818, 838) Assignment as above, and medical director’s report. (892) Report of Major Proskaner of operations on November 27th and 28th, 2 wounded. Mentioned in Lieutenant-Colonel Garvin’s report.
  • No. 49–(683, 900) Assignment as above to December, 1863.
  • No. 60–Joint resolution of thanks from Congress to Battle’s brigade, February 6, 1864. [See Extracts under Third regiment.]
  • No. 67–(1024) Assignment as above, May, 1864. (1083) Mentioned in report of Gen. C. A. Battle, May 8, 1864.
  • No. 68–(715) Mentioned by Gen. G. K. Warren (Union), May 13, 1864.
  • No. 88–(1217) Assignment as above, August 31, 1864.
  • No. 89–(1194) Battle’s brigade, Lee’s army, October 31, 1864, Lieut.-Col. John C. Goodgame in command of regiment. (1246, 1364) Assignment as above, Colonel Pickens.
  • No. 90–(564) Battle’s brigade, with Gen. J. A. Early, Cedar Creek, October 19, 1864. Capt. P. D. Ross commanding regiment. (1002, 1013) Assignment as above.
  • No. 95–(336) Mentioned in report of Capt. J. F. Carter (Third Maryland, U. S.) of operations, March 25, 1865. (1270) Battle’s brigade, in Lee’s army.
  • No. 96–(1172, 1181, 1270) Assignment as above to February 28, 1865.
  • No. 97–(263) Mentioned in report of Gen. J. G. Parke (U. S.), March 29, 1865
February 2 2015

Hilliard’s Legion

 

HILLIARD’S LEGION.

Hilliard’s Legion was organized at Montgomery, June, 1862, and consisted of five battalions; one of these, a mounted battalion, was early detached and became part of the Tenth Confederate cavalry. The Legion proceeded to Montgomery nearly 3,000 strong, under the command of Col. H. W. Hilliard, and was placed in McCown’s brigade. It took part in the siege of Cumberland Gap, and spent the fall and winter in Kentucky and east Tennessee. In April, Col. J. Thorington took command of the Legion, and was succeeded in command of the First battalion by Lieut.-Col. J. Holt, the whole Legion serving in Gracie’s brigade at Chickamauga. In this battle it earned a splendid reputation. The First and Second battalions suffered the heaviest loss, leaving more than half their number either dead or wounded on the field. Lieutenant-Colonel Holt was severely wounded, and the command of the First battalion fell upon Captain Huguley. Maj. Daniel S. Troy was in command after Chickamauga. Lieutenant-Colonel Hall and Captain Walden, successively in command of the Second battalion, were both wounded. This battalion was the first to plant its banner on the enemy’s works. The colors were pierced by 83 bullets. The standard-bearer, Robert Y. Hiett, was made a lieutenant. The other battalions also fought nobly and suffered severely both in officers and men.

The Third was complimented on the field by General Pond. The legion continued fighting in Gracie’s brigade in east Tennessee until, on November 25, 1863, it was dissolved. Parts of the First and Third were consolidated and formed the Sixtieth Alabama, under Col. J. W. A. Sanford; the Second and Fourth, under Col. Bolling Hall, Jr., became the Fifty-ninth Alabama. Three companies of the First battalion became the Twenty-third battalion, or Stallworth’s sharpshooters. The history of the legion is continued in the records of these organizations.

EXTRACTS FROM OFFICIAL WAR RECORDS.

  • Vol. XVI, Part I–(1010) September 22, 1862, at Cumberland Gap.
  • Vol. XVI, Part 2–(708) June 26, 1862, ordered to Chattanooga. (717) July 2d, mentioned by secretary of war. (720) July 4th, ordered to Atlanta, Ga. (726) July 11th, ordered to Chattanooga to report to Major-General McCown. (748) Mentioned by J. F. Belton, as ordered to report to General Stevenson, August 8th. (824) Reeves’ (Fourth) battalion at Clinton, September 14th. (847, 873) September, at Cumberland Gap. (874) September 25th, cavalry ordered to Winchester. (975) Cavalry under Maj. M. M. Slaughter ordered to Flat Lick, October 22d. (984) October 31st, in McCown’s division, Gen. E. Kirby Smith’s force.
  • Vol. XX, Part 2–(412-414) November 20, 1862, headquarters Knoxville, Tenn., 1,095 present for duty; four battalions formed the Fifth brigade. (466) December 27th, First and Fourth battalions at Big Creek Gap; Second battalion at Cumberland Gap; Third battalion at Clinton.
  • Vol. XXIII, Part 2–(644, 645) February 20, 1863, with Gen. D. S. Donelson. First and Fourth battalions at Big Creek Gap; Second at Cumberland Gap; Third at Knoxville; Company A, First battalion, at Bristol. (711) March 9th, battalions as above. First battalion, Lieut.-Col. J. Thorington; Second, Lieut.-Col. Bolling Hall, Jr.; Third, Lieut..Col. J. W. A. Sanford; Fourth, Maj. W. N. Reeves. Two companies of First at Clinton, one at Bristol. (792) April 25th, under Col. J. Thoring-ton, in Gracie’s brigade, headquarters Bean’s Station, Tenn. (946) July 31, 1863, assignment as above. First battalion, Lieut.-Col. J. H. Holt; Second, Lieut.-Col. B. Hall, Jr.; Third, Lieut.-Col. J. W. A. Sanford; Fourth, Major McLennan; headquarters, Cumberland Gap. (949) August 3d, three battalions from Cumberland Gap ordered to Strawberry Plains to report to General Gracie. <cmh7a_236>
  • No. 42–(556) General Clanton says that at Chickamauga, the colors of the Second battalion were pierced by eighty-two balls, and President Davis promoted Lieu-tenant-Colonel Hall to colonel, and the color-bearer to a lieutenancy. Says the Legion is in Gracie’s brigade, May, 1864.
  • No. 51–(16) September 19 and 20, 1863, in Gracie’s brigade, Bragg’s army. (416) Gen. William Preston in his report of Chickamauga says: “The brigade advanced with splendid courage, but was met by a destructive fire of the enemy from the cover of their fieldworks on the hill. The Second Alabama battalion stormed the hill and entered the intrenchments. Here an obstinate and bloody combat ensued. Lieutenant-Colonel Hall was severely wounded while gallantly leading his command in the assault on the hill. The Second battalion, out of 239, lost 169 killed and wounded. In the action its colors were pierced in 83 places, and were afterward, by request, presented to his Excellency, the President, who promoted the brave standard-bearer, Robert Y. Hiett, for conspicuous courage. George W. Norris, of Captain Wise’s company, of Hall’s battalion, fell at the foot of the enemy’s flagstaff and was buried where he so nobly died.” Lieutenant-Colonel Holt, of the First battalion, was severely wounded. (418) General Preston commends the gallantry of Lieutenant-Colonel Sanford, Major McLennan, Captain Walden and Surgeon Luckie. (421, 422) General Gracie’s report: “The First battalion, Alabama Legion, sustained the heaviest loss. Of 239 carried into action, 169 were killed and wounded. Among the latter was Lieutenant-Colonel Holt, seriously, in the knee. Among the killed, Lieut. R. H. Bibb ….
  • It was the Second battalion that first gained the hill and placed its colors on the enemy’s works. Its colors bear marks of over eighty bullets. Its bearer, Robert Y. Hiett, though thrice wounded and the staff thrice shot away, carried his charge throughout the entire fight. He deserves not only mention, but promotion. Lieuten-ant-Colonel Hall behaved most gallantly, receiving a severe wound in the thigh. Capt. W. D. Walden, Company B, was wounded in the breast, arm and shoulder, inside the enemy’s works. His case deserves special mention. Lieut.-Col. J. W. A. Sanford, commanding the Third battalion, Alabama Legion, nobly did his duty, <cmh7a_237>sustaining heavy loss both in officers and men. Asst. Surgeon James B. Luckie, both in the field and at the hospital, was most attentive to the wounded, as, indeed, were all the medical officers of the command. Major McLennan, commanding the Fourth Alabama Legion, nobly did his duty, sustaining heavy loss both in officers and men.” General Gracie also says: “To Lieutenant Gilmer, adjutant of the Alabama Legion, who, during the absence of its commander has acted as my assistant inspector-general, and to Messrs. George C. Jones and J. S. Harwell, both wounded, my thanks are due for services rendered at Chickamauga.” (423) Col. Y. M. Moody, Forty-third Alabama, says: “This (Second) battalion assisted in holding enemy’s works at Chickamauga.  . . On September 19th, the Third battalion, Alabama Legion, was left on top of a slight elevation, to support Jeffries’ and Baxter’s batteries. We remained at this point until the morning of the 20th, exposed during evening of the 19th to enemy’s shells.” (424, 425) Captain Huguley, of First battalion, says: “Colonel Holt was severely wounded early in the action, and the command devolved on me. We went into the engagement with 238, and had 24 killed and 144 wounded, 16 of whom were officers.” (425, 426) Lieut. C. Hall says: “Lieuten-ant-Colonel Hall, while leading the command under the fiercest fire, was shot down at a time when by hard fighting we had almost reached the enemy’s works. Captain Walden assumed command, and bravely led the still advancing line until shot down within the enemy’s lines. Lieutenant Fisher, a brave officer of Company C, about this time was mortally wounded. The works were carried and the enemy driven before us in confusion. The battalion carried into action 230 aggregate; of these, 16 were killed, 75 wounded, many mortally.” Commends bravery of Capt. L. H. Crumpler and Lieut. John H. Porter. (426, 427) Lieut.-Col. J. W. A. Sanford says: “We (Third battalion) carried into the fight on the 20th instant, 229 men. Of this number, 4 were killed and 42 wounded.” He especially commends for courage and skill, Capt. John McCreless, Surgeon James B. Luckie, Corporal Hutto and Privates Hix, Turner and Tally of Company A; Sergeant Baygents and Privates Jackson, Brooks and Hall of Company B; Private Brown, Company C; Privates Hufham, Quillan and Jesse L. Jackson <cmh7a_238>of Company D; Sergeant Harris and Privates Harris, Lewis, Skinner and Williams of Company E; Privates Simmons, Patrick and Jackson of Company F. (427, 428) Major McLennan of Fourth battalion commends conduct of Privates McCain, Holly, King, Head, of Company A; Corporal French and Privates Anderson, Flournoy, Smith, of Company B; Sergeant Mahone, Sergeant Daniels and Privates Daniel, Hill, Rutledge, Bennett, of Company D; Sergeant Stuckey, Corporal Martin, Corporal Curable and Privates Phillips and Lancey, of Company E, for conspicuous gallantry on the field.
  • Roll of honor, Chickamauga, First battalion: Adjt. John Massey, Private John H. Conner,(*) Company A; Private J. E. Wright, Company B; Private James M. Gibson, Company C; Private B. A. Davis,(*) Company D; Sergt. J. L. Cox,(*) Company E; Private A. J. Daw,(*) Company F. Second battalion: Capt. W. D. Walden, Company B; Private John H. Randall, Company A; First Sergt. Socrates Spigener, Company B; Private Benj. F. Temple,(*) Company C; Private William P. Jones, Company D; Private George W. Norris,(*) Company E; Corp. Jos. V. Castlebury,(*) Company F. Third battalion: Capt. John McCreless, Company E; Private Micajah Kirkland,(*) Company A; Private John Blanken-ship, Company C; Private Henry R. Lewis, Company C. Fourth battalion: Private Jackson Lee,(*) Company A; Corp. James E. French, Company B; Private B. F. Martin,(*) Company D; Private R. S. Turlington,(*) Company E.
  • No. 54–(452) November 30, 1863, Gracie’s brigade, Gen. B. R. Johnson’s forces. First battalion, Maj. D. S. Troy; Second, Capt. John H. Dillard; Third, Lieut.-Col. J. W. A. Sanford; Fourth, Maj. John D. McLennan. No. 55–(659) In Gracie’s brigade, Buckner’s division; detached November 22d, for operations against Burnside in east Tennessee.
  • No. 56–(891) December 31, 1863, Gracie’s brigade, Longstreet’s corps. Parts of First and Third (Sixtieth Alabama), under Colonel Sanford; Second and Fourth (Fifty-ninth Alabama), under Colonel Hall.
  • No. 78–(589) May, 1864, General Clanton speaks of Legion as in Gracie’s brigade. Same mention as above, No. 42, p. 556.

(*) Killed in action.

 

February 2 2015

2nd Alabama Cavalry

 THE SECOND ALABAMA CAVALRY.

The Second Alabama cavalry was organized at Montgomery in May, 1862; was in north Alabama for a short time and was then sent to Florida, where it was employed for a time; sent to Jackson, Miss., in April, 1863, and fought Grierson; was employed in Mississippi until October of that year, when it was sent to northern Alabama and Tennessee. It was in Chalmers’ brigade continuously after August, 1863. In General Wheeler’s cavalry corps, this regiment did arduous duty in the Dalton-Atlanta campaign, losing heavily in the battle of July 22d before Atlanta. It skirmished in Sherman’s rear, fighting almost daily, and followed him to Greensboro, N.C.; it formed part of the escort of President Davis to Georgia, where it surrendered at Forsyth, 450 strong. It was commanded for a short time by Col. J. S. Prather, succeeded by Capt. R. G. Earle, who, after his promotion, was killed at Kingston, Ga. It was successively commanded by Lieut.-Cols. J. P. West and J. N. Carpenter, both of whom had risen from the rank of captain. Capt. Wm. L. Allen died in the service. Capt. J. W. Whisenant was wounded at Kenesaw, Capt. James A. Andrews at Nickajack, Capt. Wm. P. Ashley at Decatur, Ga.

EXTRACTS FROM OFFICIAL WAR RECORDS.

  • Vol. XVI, Part I–(729) Mentioned in Colonel Milliken’s (Union) report of skirmishes near Russellville, Ala., July, 1862, two companies of Second Alabama cavalry.
  • Vol. XVI, Part 2–(767) General Bragg’s order, No. 121, Chattanooga, Tenn., August 21, 1862, says: “A portion of our cavalry, consisting of the companies of Captains Earle, Lewis and Roddey, led by Captain Roddey, has made another brilliant dash upon a superior force of the enemy, resulting in their utter discomfiture and the capture of 123 prisoners. The judgment and prudence of the previous dispositions exhibited high military skill. The vigor and boldness of the attack is a striking example of the spirit that now animates our cavalry and which is fast making them the terror of our invaders.”
  • Vol. XXIII, Part I–(136, 137) Mentioned by R. W. Johnson, March, 1863, and in Col. Fielder A. Jones’ report; Col. J. S. Prather commanding.
  • No. 36–(535, 536) Mentioned in Col. C. R. Barteau’s report, Grierson’s raid from La Grange, Tenn., April 22, 1863. (560-580) Mentioned in Gen. Daniel Ruggles’ report of May 13th. (690) Commended in General Ruggles’ <cmh7a_256>report of action at King’s Creek, near Tupelo, Miss. (691) Col. J. Cunningham, in his report of action at King’s creek, May 5th, says: “Two killed.” (692) Mentioned by Maj. W. A. Hewlett, May 5th. (693) Mentioned in Col. C. R. Barteau’s report of King’s Creek, May 8th.
  • No. 37–(483) General Ruggles, in his report of fight at Rocky Crossing, Tallahatchee river, June 20, 1863, says: “Col. C. R. Barteau’s Second Tennessee, Col. William Boyle’s First Alabama, and R. H. Earle’s Second Alabama regiments of cavalry vied with each other in pressing the enemy home.”
  • No. 38–(291) Gen. G. M. Dodge, May 9, 1863, says: “The Second Alabama arrived at Okolona from Pensacola.” (326) Mentioned as near Okolona, May 18th. (733) Maj. W. M. Inge’s battalion ordered to report to Brigadier-General Chalmers, April 10th. (796) Col. C. R. Barteau, April 27th, says: “Ordered from Aberdeen to Buena Vista.” (803) Gen. J. C. Pemberton says: “Just arrived at Jackson, Miss., April 29th. (835) Gen. S. B. Buckner, May 5th, says: “I sent the Second Alabama cavalry to General Pemberton to aid in covering northern Mississippi and Alabama.” (917) The Second Alabama cavalry at Prairie Mound, Miss., May 24th. (973) Mentioned by General Ruggles, June 22d.
  • No. 53–(5) With General Ferguson at New Albany, Miss., October 1, 1863. (559) In Ferguson’s brigade, August 27th, 949 strong. (576, 577) Mentioned in Gen. S. D. Lee’s report of September 1st. (582) Mentioned by Gen. B. S. Ewell. (724) Ordered to move at once to the vicinity of Cherry creek and there await further orders from the major-general commanding, October 2d.
  • No. 54–(37, 38) Mentioned by Gen. S. W. Ferguson, October 31, 1863, as commanded by Colonel Earle near Courtland, Ala.
  • No. 56–(728) Under Col. R. G. Earle in Ferguson’s brigade, Chalmers’ division, November 20, 1863. (866) In Ferguson’s brigade cavalry, in Mississippi, commanded by Gen. Stephen D. Lee, December 24th; Lieut.-Col. J. P. West commanding regiment.
  • No. 57–(333) Under Colonel Earle in Ferguson’s brigade, Polk’s army, February 20, 1864. (378) Mentioned by Gen. S. W. Ferguson.
  • No. 59–(605, 660, 864) In Ferguson’s brigade, Jack. son’s division, General Polk’s army, spring, 1864. <cmh7a_257>
  • No. 74–(646, 654, 660, 666) Under Lieut.-Col. John N. Carpenter, June 10, 1864; in Ferguson’s brigade, army of Mississippi. July 31st, Ferguson’s brigade, army of Tennessee.
  • No. 78–(857) September 20, 1864, in Ferguson’s brigade, army of Tennessee.
  • No. 99–(1072) January 31, 1865, in Ferguson’s brigade, Iverson’s division, Wheeler’s corps, department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida; General Hardee commanding.

 

February 2 2015

11th Tennessee Infantry Regiment

Organized at Camp Cheatham June 1, 1861; Confederate service August, 1861; reorganized May, 1862; formed Companies “F” and “K” of the 2nd Consolidated Tennessee Infantry Regiment which was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina May 2, 1865.

FIELD OFFICERS

  • Colonels-James E. Rains, George W. Gordon, James A. Long.
  • Lieutenant Colonels-T. P. Bateman, Howell Webb, George W. Gordon, William R. Thedford, James A. Long.
  • Majors-Hugh R. Lucas, William R. Thedford, William Green, Philip Van Horn Weems, John E. Binns.

Most of the companies had two different letters, one when mustered into state service, the other when accepted into Confederate service. The letters shown below are the final letters, with the original letters indicated.

CAPTAINS

  • Josiah H. Pitts, William I. White, Co. “A”, formerly “G”. Men from Humphreys County.
  • J. Richard McCann, Edward W. Clark, Co. “B”, formerly “F”. “The Cheatham Rifles.” Men from Davidson County.
  • William R. Green, William H. McCanley, Co. “C”, formerly “C”. Men from Dickson County.
  • George Maney, James E. Rains, John E. Biuns, Co. “D”, formerly “A”. “The Hermitage Guards.” Men from Davidson County.
  • William J. Mallory, Robert A. W. James, Co. “E”, formerly “E”. Men from Dickson and Cheatham Counties.
  • James A. Long, James H. Darden, Jerrie Batts, Co. “F”, formerly “D”. Men from Robertson County.
  • Samuel C. Godshall, Edward J. Guilford, James G. Stevens, Co. “G”, formerly “B”. “The Beauregard Light Infantry.” Men from Davidson County.
  • Thomas P. Bateman, Philip Van Horn Weems, 3. H. Johnson, Co. “H”, formerly “I”.Men from Hickman County.
  • Hugh R. Lucas, John D. Woodward, George W. Gordon, Isaac P. Young, Co. “I” formerly “K”. “The Ghebers.” Men from Humphreys County.
  • William R. Thedford, Franklin F. Tidwell, Co. “K”, formerly “H”. Men from Dickson County.

Of the field officers, Colonel Rains and Colonel Gordon both became brigadier generals. Colonel Long died September 19, 1864. Lieutenant Colonels Bateman, Webb, and Thedford all resigned. Major Lucas failed of re-election; Major Green died in prison; and Major Weems was killed in July, 1864.

The 10 companies composing the regiment were organized in their respective counties at various times during the month of May. They assembled at Nashville where they were sworn into state service, and sent to Camp of Instruction at Camp Cheatham where they were organized into a regiment about the first of June, 1861.

Prior to the organization of the regiment, Captain George Maney, of the “Hermitage Guards,” was elected colonel of the 1st Tennessee Infantry Regiment, which was organized May 2, 1861. James E. Rains succeeded him as captain of the company, and then was elected colonel of the regiment. Thus the “Hermitage Guards” supplied colonels for ~wo regiments, both of whom later became brigadier generals. George W. Gordon also became a brigadier general, so the companies comprising the 11th Infantry furnished three brigadier generals to the Confederacy, a quite impressive record.

In July, 1861 the regiment, with 880 men armed with 710 flintlock muskets and 175 minie rifles, was ordered to East Tennessee to serve in the forces commanded by Brigadier General Felix K. Zollicoffer. They remained in this area until the fall of 1862, when they joined General Bragg’s Army at Harrodsburg, Kentucky. During most of this period, the 11th was in garrison duty at Cumberland Gap, where Colonel Rains was in command of the garrison, along with Churchwell’s 4th (later 34th) Tennessee Regiment. They had skirmishes at Wild Cat, Kentucky, (also called Rock Castle River), at Cumberland Gap and at Tazewell, but were not engaged at Fishing Creek, with Zollicoffer, nor at Perryville, with Bragg.

In March, 1862, Major General E. Kirby Smith, who had just reached East Tennessee to assume command, reported that the forces in that area were in a state of chaos. He reported Colonel Rains had 4000 men at Cumberland Gap, but urged the appointment of a brigadier general to help him straighten things out. In April 1862, Brigadier General C. L. Stevenson assumed command at Cumberland Gap, and his brigade was listed on May 31, 1862 as composed of the 30th Alabama Regiment, 3rd Georgia Battalion, 42nd Georgia Regiment, 4th Confederate, 11th, 36th Tennessee Regiments, two companies from Cooke’s Regiment, (all infantry), 3rd Tennessee Cavalry Battalion, Eufaula (Alabama) Light Artillery, Rhett Tennessee Artillery, and Yeizer’s Georgia Battery (“Cherokee Artillery”). On June 30, 1862; the 36th Tennessee, Cooke’s two companies, and the Rhett Artillery were gone.

On July 3, 1862, Stevenson was in command of a division, and Colonel James E. Rains of a brigade, consisting of 4th Confederate, 11th Tennessee Regiment, 42nd Georgia Regiment, 3rd Georgia Battalion, 29th North Carolina Regiment (all infantry) and Yeizer’s Battery.

During this period some changes had taken place in the field officers of the 11th Tennessee. In April, 1862, Lieutenant Colonel Bate-man resigned and Howell Webb succeeded him. At the reorganization in May, 1862, J. E. Rains was re-elected colonel, G. W. Gordon lieutenant colonel, and William Thedford major. In November, 1862, Rains was promoted to brigadier general in command of the same brigade, except that the Eufaula Artillery had replaced Yeizer’s Artillery. Lieutenant Colonel Gordon succeeded him as colonel of the 11th, William Thedford became lieutenant colonel, and William Green major.

In December, 1862, the brigade was transferred from Stevenson’s Division to that of Major General J. P. McCown, and as part of his division fought in the Battle of Murfreesboro, December 31, 1862. Rains’ Brigade in this battle was composed of the 3rd Georgia Battalion, 9th Georgia Battalion, 2~h North Carolina and 11th Tennessee Infantry Regiments, and the Eufaula Light Artillery. The 11th suffered 83 casualties, including Colonel Gordon, who was wounded. General Rains was killed and Colonel Robert B. Vance took command of the brigade.

On January 21, 1863, the 11th was transferred from Vance’s Brigade, M~own’s Division, to Brigadier General Preston Smith’s Brigade, Cheatham’s Division. On April 1, 1863 Smith’s Brigade consisted of the 11th, l2th/47th, 13th/154th, and 29th Tennessee Infantry Regiments, plus Scott’s Tennessee Battery. Here was formed an association which was to last throughout the remainder of the war, for these six Tennessee regiments continued to serve in the same brigade, under various brigade and divisional commanders until the final surrender in North Carolina. At this time the brigade had an effective total of 2315 officers and men.

After the Battle of Murfreesboro, the 11th went into winter quarters at Shelbyville, where they remained until June 27, when they retreated with the army to Chattanooga. In the Battle of Chickamauga, September 19-20, 1863, the 11th captured 200 prisoners and the colors of the 74th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment. General Smith was killed and Colonel (later brigadier general) Alfred J. Vaughan, Jr. took command of the brigade.

After the battle, the brigade was transferred for a time to Major General Thomas C. Hindman’s Division of Lieutenant General James Longstreet’s Corps, and on October 22, 1863 the 11th moved to Sweetwater, but returned November 5, and participated in the Battle of Missionary Ridge, November 25, 1863, where they suffered heavy losses. Major Green was mortally wounded, captured, and soon after died.

On December 10, 1863, Hindman’s Division was listed in Major General John C. Breckinridge’s Corps, and on December 14, the 11th reported 340 effectives present. On December 31, 1863, General Hindman was in command of the Corps, but on February 20, 1864, the brigade was once again in Major General B. F. Cheatham’s Division, and remained there till the end.

After Missionary Ridge, the 11th retreated to Dalton, Georgia, where they remained till the beginning of the Atlanta Campaign May 7, 1864, except for one short lived expedition to Demopolis, Alabama, and return in February 1864. while at Dalton, Captain I. A. Long was first promoted major, and later to lieutenant colonel upon the resignation of Lieutenant Colonel Thedford. Captain P. V. H. Weems was promoted to major to succeed him.

As a part of Cheatram’s Division, Vaughan’s Brigade, the regiment participated in the almost daily fighting from Dalton to Atlanta, to Jonesboro. At Atlanta on July 22, Major Weems was killed, and Captain I. E. Binns was promoted major to succeed him. On August 15, 1864, Colonel George W. Gordon was promoted brigadier general and commanded. the brigade till the Battle of Franklin, where he was wounded and captured. Lieutenant Colonel Long took command of the regiment, but was himself mortally wounded at Jonesboro August 31, 1864.

After Colonel Long’s death, the 11th and 29th were consolidated under Colonel Horace Rice of the 29th, and Major John Binns of the 11th.

On the march back to Tennessee, the llth/29th was detached from the main army at Gadsden, Alabama, and sent to Blountsville, Alabama, where it was to meet and convoy a supply train of 700 wagons across Sand Mountain. It rejoined the army at Courtland, from thence to Florence and then back into Tennessee. At Franklin, November 30, Gordon’s Brigade was in the front line of Major General John C. Brown’s Division, Cheatham’s Corps. Every brigade commander in the division except Gordon was killed, and Gordon was captured.

On December 10, 1864, Colonel William M. Watkins was shown in command of the brigade which now consisted of the llth/29th Consolidated, commanded by Major John E. Binus, l2th/47th Consolidated, l3th/Sisti-52nd/154th Consolidated Tennessee Infantry Regiments, the 51st and 52nd having been added to the brigade after the Battle of Franklin.

It participated in the Battle of Nashville, December 15, 1864, then joined General Joseph E. Johnston in North Carolina for the Battle of Bentonville March 19, 1865. At this time the llth/29th was commanded by Captain F. F. Tidwell.

On April 9, 1865 the 11th formed part of Brigadier General Joseph B. Palmer’s Brigade, Cheatham’s Division, which was surrendered and paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina May 2, 1865. The 11th formed Companies “F” and “K” of the 2nd Consolidated Tennessee Infantry Regiment, which was composed of survivors of the 11th, 12th, 13th, 29th, 47th, 50th, 51st, 52nd and 154th Tennessee Infantry Regiments under the command of Lieutenant Colonel George W. Pease.

April 13 2014

North Carolina Confederate Units

North Carolina Confederate Units

6th Regiment of North Carolina Cavalry

37th Regiment of North Carolina Infantry

38th Regiment of North Carolina Infantry


Sixth North Carolina Cavalry

65th North Carolina State Troops


How to Order a Copy of the Printed History

Organizational Structure

The 6th North Carolina Cavalry regiment was officially organized by the consolidation of the 5th and 7th North Carolina Cavalry Battalions on August 3, 1863 under terms of special order 183, paragraph 16, from the Confederate Adjutant and Inspector General’s Office. An error in this order designated the unit the 66th North Carolina State Troops, and it was referred to as such until the error was noticed and corrected in late 1863 by Confederate officials, though it was properly numbered by the North Carolina Adjutant General. Another matter of confusion was that companies were not redesigned until early 1864, and for several months there were two company As, two company Bs, etc. The discussion of the individual units shows the previous designations of each company. Most companies have four clothing receipt rolls which fill in some details omitted in the muster rolls.

Field and Staff

No muster rolls for the field and staff of this regiment survive today. Regimental officers were:

  • George Nathaniel Folk – Colonel
  • Alfred Hunter Baird – Lieutenant Colonel
  • Thaddeus P. Siler – Major
  • J. J. Spann – Major
  • Martin B. Moore, Quartermaster

Company A

Company A, was formerly Company F, 7th North Carolina Cavalry Battalion, and has the distinction of being the only regular Confederate Army unit from Johnson County, Tennessee. Captain Barton Roby Brown recruited this company. Extant muster rolls cover the periods:

  • June 30 to August 31, 1863, lists 58 men, located at Loudon, Tennessee.
  • August 31 to December 31, 1863, lists 51 men, located at Camp Erwin, near Rutherfordton, North Carolina.
  • December 31, 1863 to May 1, 1864, lists 62 men, posted near Kinston, North Carolina.
  • April 30 to August 31, 1864, lists 81 men, stationed at Williamston, North Carolina.
  • An undated roster, apparently for September 1 to October 28, 1864, lists 74, stationed near Kinston, North Carolina.

Company B

This company, from Ashe County, North Carolina, was formerly Company D, 5th North Carolina Cavalry Battalion. Extant musters for this company while serving in the 6th cover the periods from:

  • April 30 to August 31, 1863, lists 96 men, stationed in “east Tennessee.”
  • August 31 to December 31, 1863, lists 62 men, stationed at Rutherfordton, North Carolina.
  • December 31, 1863 to April 30, 1864, lists 87 men, located in “eastern North Carolina.”
  • April 30 to August 31, 1864, lists 96 men, stationed at Kinston.
  • August 31 to October 31, 1864, lists 104 men, stationed near Kinston.

Company C

Company C, formerly Company D, 7th North Carolina Cavalry Battalion, was consolidated with the Artillery Company attached to the 7th Battalion. Extant musters for this company cover these periods:

  • November 1, 1862 to February 28, 1863, lists 90 men, located at Zollicoffer, Tennessee.
  • June 30 to August 31, 1863, lists 92 men, station not noted.
  • August 31 to December 31, 1863, lists 62 men, located at Rutherfordton, North Carolina.
  • December 31, 1863 to April 30, 1864, lists 82 men, stationed at Kinston, North Carolina.
  • April 30 to August 31, 1864, lists 73 men, stationed at Kinston.
  • August 31 to October 31, 1864, lists 69 men, stationed near Kinston, North Carolina.

Company D

Company D was formerly Company E, 7th North Carolina Cavalry Battalion. Extant musters for this company cover these periods:

  • November 1, 1862 to March 1, 1863, lists 96 men, located at Zollicoffer, Tennessee.
  • July 1 to August 31, 1863, lists 85 men, stationed at Loudon, Tennessee.
  • September 1 to December 31, 1863, lists 75 men, stationed at Rutherfordton, North Carolina.
  • December 31, 1863 to April 30, 1864, lists 74 men, stationed at Kinston, North Carolina.
  • April 30 to August 31, 1864, lists 64 men, posted near Kinston.
  • September 30 to October 31, 1864, lists 43 men, posted near Kinston, North Carolina.

Company E

Company E was formerly Company A, 7th North Carolina Cavalry Battalion. Extant musters for this company cover the following periods:

April 30 to August 31, 1863, lists 111 men, but the unit’s station not recorded on the roll. September 1 to December 31, 1863, lists 90 men, but the location of the company was unrecorded. January 1 to April 30, 1864, lists 71 men, stationed near Kinston. April 30 to August 31, 1864, lists 71 men, stationed at Kinston. September 30 to October 31, 1864, lists 76 men, stationed near Kinston, North Carolina.

Company F

Company F was formerly Company B, 7th North Carolina Cavalry Battalion. This company was from Clay County on the Georgia border. Extant musters for this company while serving in the 6th cover the period.

  • January 1 to February 28, 1863, lists 100 men, located near Zollicoffer, Tennessee.
  • June 30 to August 31, 1863, lists 104 men, but the station was not recorded.
  • September 1 to December 31, 1863, lists 108 men, located at Rutherfordton, North Carolina.
  • December 31, 1863 to April 30, 1864, lists 54 men, stationed at Kinston, North Carolina.
  • April 30 to August 31, 1864, lists 62 men, located at Kinston.
  • September 30 to October 31, 1864, lists 59 men, stationed near Kinston, North Carolina.

Company G (1st Organization)

Company G was the artillery company attached to the 7th Cavalry Battalion. Extant musters for this company while serving in the 6th is for the period June 30, 1863 to December 31, 1863 and lists 43 men.

Company G (2nd Organization)

Company G, formerly Company C, 7th North Carolina Cavalry Battalion has extant musters roll which conver:

  • June 30 to August 31, 1863, lists 90 men stationed near Blountville, Tennessee.
  • August 31 to December 31, 1863, lists 56 men, stationed at Rutherfordton, North Carolina.
  • December 31, 1863 to April 30, 1864, lists 55 men, stationed near Kinston, North Carolina.
  • May 1 to August 31, 1864 and lists 31 men located near Kinston.
  • September 1, to October 31, 1864 and lists 35 men.

Company H

Company H was formerly Company C, 5th North Carolina Cavalry Battalion. Extant musters for this company cover these periods:

  • April 30 to August 31, 1863, lists 57 men stationed near Cumberland, Tennessee.
  • August 31 to December 31, 1863, lists 26 men, stationed at Erwin’s Camp Ground, North Carolina.
  • December 31, 1863 to April 30, 1864, lists 29 men, posted at Shiloh Church North Carolina.
  • April 30 to August 31, 1864, lists 76 men, camped near Kinston.

Company I

Company I was formerly Company A, 5th North Carolina Cavalry Battalion. Extant musters for this company cover these periods:

  • April 30 to December 31, 1863, lists 88 men, but the location was not stated.
  • December 31, 1863 to April 30, 1864, lists 9 men, near Kinston.
  • April 30 to August 31, 1864, lists 17 men, stationed near Kinston.
  • June 31 to September 1, 1864, lists 30 men, stationed near Kinston, North Carolina.
  • August 31 to October 31, 1864, lists 16 men, stationed near Kinston, North Carolina.

Company K

Company K was formerly Company B, 5th North Carolina Cavalry Battalion. Extant musters for this company while serving in the 6th cover the period.

  • August 31 to December 31, 1863 and lists 11 men, but the location of the company was not stated on the roll.
  • December 31, 1863 to April 30, 1864 and lists 32 men, when stationed near Kinston, North Carolina.
  • April 30 to August 31, 1864 and lists 30 men, stationed near Kinston, North Carolina.
  • June 31 to September 1, 1864 and lists 69 men, stationed near Kinston, North Carolina.

Captain Martin V. Moore reported in his recollections of the 6th that the companies had the following strength’s following the consolidations of the 5th and 7th North Carolina Cavalry Battalions.

Unit Men Officers Total
Co. A 89 4 93
Co. B 89 4 93
Co. C 27 2 29
Co. D 56 3 59
Co. E 68 3 71
Co. F 46 4 50
Co. G 50 3 53
Co. H 55 3 58
Co. I 13 1 14
Co. K N/A N/A N/A
Total 493 27 520

How to order a copy of a printed full history of this organization:

Contact the publisher: H. E. Howard, Inc., PO Box 4161, Lynchburg, VA 24502-0161. The price is $19.95 plus $2.50 postage and handling and 4 1/2 percent Virginia tax if you live in the Old Dominion.

The formal version of this book by Jeffrey C. Weaver, contains a narrative history of the 5th and 7th Battalions North Carolina Cavalry as well as the 6th Regiment North Carolina Cavalry. The book contains a narrative history of the operations of these units, photos of some of the men, maps, and a detailed roster of all the soldiers who served in the units. This book is the first of a proposed Confederate Regimental History Series.

Norman Sidney Sylvestor Norton

Company A, 6th Regiment of North Carolina Cavalry


37th North Carolina State Troops

A Brief History

The unit was enlisted at Jefferson, North Carolina, the county seat of Ashe County on Aug. 27, 1861. It was formed of residents of Ashe County and called “Ashe Beauregard Riflemen”. The unit was mustered into state service on Nov. 20, 1861, and was assigned to the 37th Regiment North Carolina Troops as Company A.

The 37th had a long and glorious battle campaign. In March of 1862 they fought at New Bern, North Carolina, and in May and June they were in Hanover Court House, Gaines’ Mill and Fraziers’s Farm, Virginia. Summertime saw conflicts in Richmond, Second Manassas, Ox Hill and the Bloodiest day in American History at Sharpsburg, Maryland. The 37th was involved in major battles at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and Petersburg to name a few. On April 9, 1865 the 37th was present and accounted for at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, For laying down of arms and surrender to Federal troops to end the war between the states.


NORTH CAROLINA 37TH INFANTRY REGIMENT

Organization: Organized at High Point on November 20, 1861. Reorganized in April 1862. Surrendered at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, 11 April 9, 1865.

First Commander: Charles C. Lee (Colonel)
Field Officers:
John B. Ashcraft (Major, Lieutenant Colonel)
William M. Barbour (Lieutenant Colonel, Colonel)
Jackson L. Bost (Major)
Owen N. Brown (Major)
John G. Bryan (Major)
Charles N. Hickerson (Major, Lieutenant Colonel)
William G. Morris (Major, Lieutenant Colonel)
Rufus M. Rankin (Major) (doubtful)
William R. Rankin (Major)

Assignments:

District of the Pamlico, Department of North Carolina (November 1861 -March 1862)
Branch’s Brigade, District of the Pamlico, Department of North Carolina (March 1862)
Branch’s Brigade, Department of North Carolina (April-May 1862)
Branch’s Brigade, Department of Northern Virginia (May 1862)
Branch’s Brigade, A. P. Hill’s Division, Department of Northern Virginia (May-June 1862)
Branch’s Brigade, A. P. Hill’s Division, Ist Corps, Army of Northern Virginia (June-July 1862)
Branch’s-Lane’s Brigade, A. P. Hill’s Division, 2nd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia (July 1862-May 1863)
Lane’s Brigade, Pender’s-Wilcox’s Division, 3rd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia (May 1863-April 1865)

Battles:

New Bern (March 17, 1862)
Hanover Court House (May 27, 1862)
Slash Church (May 27, 1862)
Seven Days Battles (June 25-July 1, 1862)
Beaver Darn Creek ()une 26, 1862)
Gaines’ Mill (June 27, 1862)
Frayser’s Farm (June 30, 1862)
Malvern Hill (July 1, 1862)
Cedar Mountain (August 9, 1862)
2nd Bull Run (August 28-30, 1862)
Chantilly (September 1, 1862)
Harpers Ferry (September 1245, 1862)
Antietam (September 17, 1862)
Shcpherdstown Ford (September 20,1862)
Fredericksburg (December 1.3, 1862)
Chancellorsville (May 1-4, 1863)
Gettysburg (July 1-3, 1863)
Falling Waters (July 10, 1863)
Bristoe Campaign (October-November 1863)
Bristoe Station (October 14, 1863)
Mine Run Campaign (November-December 1863)
The Wilderness (May 5-6, 1864)
Spotsylvania Court House (May 8-21, 1864)
North Anna (May 22-26, 1864)
Cold Harbor (June 1-3, 1864)
Petersburg Siege (June 1864-April 1865)
Gravel Hill (July 28, 1864)
Fussell’s Mill (August 16, 1864)
Reams’ Station (August 25, 1864)
Squirrel Level Road (September 30, 1864)
Jones’ Farm (September 30, 1864)
Pegram’s Farm (October 1, 1864)
Hatcher’s Run (February 5-7, 1865)
Petersburg Final Assault (April 2, 1865)
Battery Gregg (April 2, 1865)
Jetersvilie (April 5, 1865)
Farmville (April 7, 1865)
Appomattox Court House (April 9, 1865)

Further Reading: Alexander, John Brevard. Reminiscences of the Past Sixty Years.

Jacob A. Kever

Company A, 37th Regiment of North Carolina Infantry


38th North Carolina State Troops

A Brief History

NORTH CAROLINA 38TH INFANTRY REGIMENT

Organization:

Organized for 12 months at Camp Mangum, near Raleigh on January 17, 1862. Reorganized at Camp Mason, near Raleigh, on April 18, 1862. Surrendered at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, on April 9, 1865.

First Commander: William J. Hoke (Colonel)
Field Officers:
Lorenzo D. Andrews (Major)
Robert F. Armfield (Lieutenant Colonel)
John Ashford (Major, Lieutenant Colonel, Colonel)
Oliver H. Dockery (Lieutenant Colonel)
George W. Flowers (Major, Lieutenant Colonel)
Murdock M. McLauchlin (Major)
George W. Sharpe (Major)
John T. Wilson (Major)

Assignments:
Department of North Carolina (January-March 1862)
J. R. Anderson’s Brigade, Department of North Carolina (March-June 1862)
Pender’s Brigade, A. P. Hill’s Division, Army of Northern Virginia (June 1862)
Pender’s Brigade, A. P. Hill’s Division, Ist Corps, Army of Northern Virginia (June-July 1862)
Pender’s Brigade, A. P. Hill’s Division, 2nd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia (July 1862-May 1863)
Scales’ Brigade, Pender’s-Wilcox’s Division, 3rd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia (May 1863-April 1865)

Battles:
Seven Days Battles (June 25-July 1, 1862)
Beaver Dam Creek (June 26, 1862)
Gaines’ Mill (June 27, 1862)
Frayser’s Farm (June 30, 1862)
Cedar Mountain (August 9, 1862)
2nd Bull Run (August 28-30, 1862)
Harpers’ Ferry (September 12-15, 1862)
Antietam (not engaged) (September 17, 1862)
Shepherdstown Ford (September 20, 1862)
Fredericksburg (Decernber 13, 1862)
Chancellorsville (May 1-4, 1863)
Gettysburg (July 1-3, 1863)
Falling Waters (July 10, 1863)
Bristoe Campaign (October-November 1863)
Mine Run Campaign (Noveniber-Dcceniher 1863)
The Wilderness (May 5-6, 1864)
Spotsylvania Court House (May 8-21, 1864)
North Anna (May 22-26, 1864)
Cold Harbor (June 1-3, 1864)
Petersburg Siege (June 1864-April 1865)
Reams’ Station (August 25, 1864)
Fort Harrison (September 29-30, 1864)
Jones’ Farm (September 30, 1864)
Hatcher’s Run (February 5-7, 1865)
Appommatox Court House (April 9, 1865)

George Washington Martin

Company C, 38th Regiment of North Carolina Infantry


  • Enlisted March 27, 1863, conscripted, Gaston County, NC, by Lt Dickey

  • April 1864 listed as “home on special furlough, expires May 1, 1864”

  • Sent to hospital on June 21, 1864

  • Listed as present for duty September 1864

  • Listed on a register of prisoners disposed of by the Provost Marshal General, Army of the Potomac, March 18, 1865. Listed as a rebel deserter. There are a couple of consecutive slips showing various transfers into Maryland.

  • March 24, 1865 listed as having taken the oath and transferred to Sullivan County, Md

  • Appears on a register of patients at C.S.A. General Hospital, Danville, Virginia. Something is wrong with his right leg and left knee, but the first word is illegible.

  • Note: It is probable he was captured as a straggler because of the leg and knee problem. It was common then to take an oath not to return to service unless a proper exchange was documented, then to be released to return home.


William Alexander Norton

Company G, 38th Regiment of North Carolina Infantry


  • Appears on a Company Muster-in and Descriptive Roll of Capt George W. Sharpe’s Company (Rocky Face Rangers), 38th Regiment of North Carolina Infantry (State Troops), from Alexander County. He was born in Alexander County NC, was 21 years old, a farmer, 5 feet 8 inches tall. He enrolled for active service on November 21, 1861 and was mustered into service on December 31, 1861 at Camp Mangum by Capt G. W. Sharpe.

  • Promoted to corporal April 18, 1862.

  • Listed as absent sick July 1862

  • Promoted to 3rd Sergeant September 13, 1862

  • Appears on a list of prisoners paroled at Centreville, Va, October 9, 1862

  • Appears on a Roll of Honor for Co G, 38th NC

  • Note: I have a copy of his pay record. It shows that he was paid on November 2, 1863 for July 1 – October 31, $17 per month, $68 total pay and includes his signature.

  • Wounded May 5, 1864 at Battle of Wilderness, Va

  • Died of wounds May 8, 1864


James F. Sharpe

Company G, 38th Regiment of North Carolina Infantry

April 13 2014

12th Alabama Infantry Regiment

12th Alabama Infantry Regiment

Seven Pines, Malvern Hill, Boonsboro, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancorsville, Gettysburg, The Wilderness, Petersburg, Appomattox

The 12th Alabama Regiment was organized at Richmond in July 1861, with members from Montgomery and Mobile, and Coffee, Coosa, De Kalb, Jackson, Macon, Morgan, and Pike counties. It was at once moved to the “Potomac front” and first brigaded under General Richard Ewell of Virginia, who was soon after succeeded by General Robert Rodes, of Tuscaloosa. The regiment was near Manassas during the fall and winter, and it moved to Yorktown in the spring, 1862. It was under fire there and suffered lightly at Williamsburg. At Seven Pines, the regiment was in the advance that opened the battle, and it stormed the redoubt held by General Silas Casey’s division, carrying three lines of works by successive charges, and losing 70 killed and 141 wounded. It participated to some extent in the other battles before Richmond (1862), and mustered 120 men for duty after the battle of Malvern Hill. Still under Rodes, and in General Daniel H. Hill’s Division, and brigaded with the 3rd, 5th, 6th, and 26th Alabama regiments (Rode’s Brigade), the 12th was in the advance into Maryland (fall, 1862). It bore a conspicuous part at Boonsboro, and also at Sharpsburg (Antietam), losing in these battles 27 killed, 69 wounded, and 33 missing. Retiring into Virginia with the army, the regiment wintered (1862-1863) on the Rappahannock. It was under fire but not actively engaged at Fredericksburg, II Corps (LTG Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson), D. H. Hill’s Division, 1st Brigade (BG Robert Rodes), 12th Alabama (COL Samuel Pickens); but it was in the resistless column of Rodes at Chancellorsville (spring, 1863), where Col. Edward O’Neal led the brigade, and where the 12th charged 3 lines of breastworks and was badly mutilated. It skirmished at Brandy Station, and again led the way over the Potomac. At Gettysburg, it was on the extreme left and pressed the enemy in confusion through the town, then supported General George Pickett’s assault, and afterwards covered the rear II Army Corps (LTG Richard Ewell), Rode’s Division (MG Robert Rodes), O’Neal’s Brigade (COL Edward A. O’Neal), 12th Alabama (COL Samuel Pickens). After the army retired into Virginia, the 12th was engaged in several skirmishes — at Warrenton Springs, Turkey Run, etc. The winter (1864) was passed near Orange Court House, and the regiment, Gen. Cullen Battle now commanding the brigade, II Army Corps (LTG Richard S. Ewell), Rode’s Division, Battle’s Brigade (BG Cullen Battle), was hotly engaged at The Wilderness and Spotsylvania, and in the continuous skirmishing of Grant’s advance movement to Cold Harbor. The 12th then again marched into Maryland when General Jubal Early threatened Washington. It participated at Winchester with very severe loss, and in the further operations of the corps in the Valley. On its return to Petersburg, it took part (now in General John Gordon’s corps) in the struggles around that city, and surrendered at Appomattox in April, 1865. Of the original 1196, about 50 surrendered at Appomattox. And of the 321 recruits received, about 70 were there. Nearly 250 men died of wounds from battle; about 200 died of disease; and 202 were discharged. The battle-flag of the regiment was taken to Mobile after the war and is probably still there.

Field and staff officers: Cols. Robert T. Jones (Perry; KIA, Seven Pines); Bristor B. Gayle (Morgan; KIA, Boonsboro); Samuel B. Pickens (SC; wounded, Spotsylvania, Winchester); Lt. Cols. Theodore O’Hara (KY; transferred); B. B. Gayle (promoted); Samuel B. Pickens (wounded, Boonsboro; promoted); John C. Goodgame (Coosa); Majors E. D. Tracy (Madison; transferred); John C. Brown (Coffee; resigned); B. B. Gayle (promoted); Samuel B. Pickens (promoted); John C. Goodgame (promoted); Adolph Proskauer (Mobile; wounded, Chancellorsville, Spotsylvania); and Adjutants Samuel B. Pickens (promoted); Junius L. Walthall (Mobile; transferred); and L. Gayle (VA)

Captains, and counties from which the companies came:

  • Mobile: George Heuilly (until reorganization); Jule L’Etondal (died in service); T. H. Rogers (wounded, Winchester)
  • Coosa: Joseph H. Bradford (until reorganization); John C. Goodgame (promoted); Henry W. Cox (KIA, Chancellorsville); Patrick Thomas (KIA, Appomattox)
  • Mobile: Augustus Stykes (resigned); A. Proskauer (promoted); F. C. Fischer; E. Karcher
  • Coffee: John C. Brown (promoted); T. C. Horn (resigned); E. Tucker (KIA, Sharpsburg); Davis (KIA, Gettysburg); J. McCassells (KIA, The Wilderness)
  • DeKalb: W. Higgins (resigned); R. F. Patterson (resigned); W. L. Maroney (resigned); John Rogers (KIA, Spotsylvania); A. Majors (KIA, Snicker’s Gap)
  • Macon: R. F. Ligon (until reorganization); Robert H. Keeling (KIA, Seven Pines); J. W. McNeeley (wounded, Chancellorsville; transferred); Robert E. Park (wounded, Gettysburg, Winchester, and captured)
  • Jackson: A. S. Bibb (until reorganization); P. D. Ross (wounded, Gettysburg)
  • Morgan: B. B. Gayle (promoted); C. A. Darwin (KIA, Seven Pines); A. E. Hewlett (wounded, Winchester, and captured)
  • Mobile: W. T. Walthall (transferred); John J. Nicholson (wounded, Seven Pines, The Wilderness)
  • Macon: W. H. C. Price (until reorganization); D. H. Garrison (KIA, Sharpsburg); Thomas Fitzgerald (KIA, Chancellorsville); E. H. Rowell

History: “Diary of Robert E. Park,” in Southern Historical Society Papers, I (1876), pp.370-86, 430-437; II (1876), pp. 25-31, 78-85, 173-180, 232-239, 306-315; III (1877), pp. 43-46, 55-61, 127-127, 183-189, and 244-254. Robert Emory Park , “Rodes’ Brigade at Seven Pines,” in Land We Love (Charlotte, NC), vol. IV (1867/68), pp.389-391. Robert Emory Park / Sketch of the Twelfth Alabama Infantry of Battle’s Brigade, Rodes’ Division, Early’s Corps, of the Army of Northern Virginia (Richmond: William Ellis Jones, printer, 1906). “War diary of Robert Emory Park, January 28th, 1863-January 27th, 1864,” in Southern Historical Society Papers, vol. XXVI (1898), pp. 1-31.


The Commanders:

Rodes Alabama Brigade

Robert Emmett Rodes, born in Lynchburg, VA, on 29 March 1829. He graduated from Virginia Military Institute in 1848 and then served as an instructor until 1851 when he went to Alabama to begin a career as a civil engineer. He married and worked for the Northeast & Southwest Alabama Railroad as chief engineer, but just before the Civil War began, he accepted a professorship at VMI. Rodes was appointed Colonel in the 5th Alabama and fought at 1st Manassas after which he was commissioned Brigadier General, 21 October 1861. He, with his brigade, was part of Major General Daniel H. Hill’s Division. During the Peninsular Campaign, Rodes’ Brigade fought at Seven Pines (where Rodes was wounded), Gaines’ Mill, and Malvern Hill and suffered 50% casualties. After Rodes’ recovery, he led his brigade in rear guard action at South Mountain, MD; at Sharpsburg, his brigade helped hold the Confederate center at the “Bloody Lane” where Rodes was again wounded. Again, the brigade suffered severe losses, and it was not engaged at Fredericksburg. Fall and winter enlistments brought the ranks up once more, and Rodes was made division commander when Hill was sent to North Carolina. Rodes led Lieutenant General Stonewall Jackson’s flank attack at Chancellorsville and won him a promotion to Major General. At Spotsylvania, Rodes led the brilliant counterattack at the “Mule Shoe”, but four months later, 19 September 1864, at the third battle of Winchester, he was killed directing a counterattack that allowed Jubal Early’s army to retreat safely.

Edward Asbury O’Neal, born 20 September 1818, in Madison County, Alabama Territory, he attended LaGrange College (graduated 1836) and began the practice of law in Florence, AL, in 1840. He was active in local politics and the secession movement. At the outbreak of war in 1861, he joined the 9th Alabama Infantry and elected major, then lieutenant colonel. In 1862, he received a commission as colonel of the 26th Alabama Regiment and fought in Virginia through 1863 (Peninsular, Sharpsburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg campaigns). O’Neal took command of Rodes’ Brigade when Rodes was promoted to division command. However, his performance did not qualify him for promotion. At Gettysburg, for example, he kept to his 26th Regiment and allowed the other brigade regiments to flounder. His brigadier’s commission was delayed and General Robert E. Lee appointed Brigadier General Cullen A. Battle brigade commander, angering O’Neal enough that he requested a transfer. President Jefferson Davis canceled the promotion and sent O’Neal and his regiment to the Atlanta front. After the fall of that city, O’Neal was relieved, sent to duty with the Conscription Bureau in Alabama, and served out the war there. O’Neal resumed his legal and political activity during the Reconstruction period and was elected governor of Alabama in 1882 and 1884. After he retired to Florence, he died there, 7 November 1890.

Cullen Andrews Battle, born 1 June 1829, in Powelton, Georgia. Without formal military training, Battle was a capable combat officer who learned the art of war with his troops. He distinguished himself as first a regimental, then a brigade commander. Battle moved with his family to Eufaula and entered the state university to study law. He became an attorney in 1852 and was an ardent secessionist. He joined a local militia company and offered his services to Alabama immediately after the state seceded. He was commissioned lieutenant colonel in the 3rd Alabama Infantry Regiment and saw his first action at Seven Pines. He was then promoted to colonel and the regiment joined Rodes’ Brigade where Battle continued to serve until war’s end. At South Mountain, 14 September 1862, Battle faced 3 veteran Federal brigades while defending a barren hill north of the gap. In the onslaught, the 3rd Alabama broke, but Battle reacted with cool efficiency; likewise, at Antietam defending the “Bloody Lane,” Battle and his men fought courageously. Rodes’ Alabama Brigade, held in reserve, saw limited action at Fredericksburg, but at Chancellorsville, Battle participated in the division’s surprise attack against the Union right flank. His performance at Gettysburg earned him promotion to brigadier general (on 25 August, dating from 20 August, 1863) and command of (now) Battle’s Alabama Brigade. During the battles of 1864, the Alabamians suffered heavy casualties at The Wilderness, Spotsylvania, and in the Shenandoah Valley. In this last campaign, Battle led his brigade in a brilliant counterattack at 3rd Winchester before he was severely wounded at Cedar Creek (19 October 1864). The wound was incapacitating throughout the rest of the war. After the surrender, Battle resumed his law practice in Alabama. He was elected to Congress in 1868 but refused to take the “ironclad oath.” He eventually moved to New Berne, North Carolina, where he edited a newspaper. He died in Greensborough, 8 April 1905.

April 13 2014

10th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

ImageThe Tenth Arkansas Infantry Regiment was organized at Springfield in Conway County in July 1861. This is where many volunteers from Van Buren County (southern Van Buren County later became Cleburne) were mustered into the Confederate Army. Company “A,” known as “Quitman Rifles,” was headed by Captain A. R. Witt. Other officers were First Lt. W. W. Martin, Second Lt. C. M. Cargile, Third Lt. Israel Davis, and First Sergeant W. R. Corbin. The company had eight non-commissioned officers and 94 men in all.

Company “G” was called “Red River Riflemen.” Officers were Captain John B. Miller, First Lt. James E. Lockard, Second Lt. Henry J. Gatton, Third Lt. Edwin Ellis, and First Sergeant Daniel Johnson. This company with ten non-commissioned officers had 91 men.

Other companies in the regiment were the “Randy Rifles,” the “Choctaw Riflemen” from Conway County, “Pemberton’s Company,” “Muddy Bayou Heroes,” “Perry County Mountaineers…… Conway Tigers,” and “Springfield Sharpshooters.” Field and staff officers for the Tenth were Colonel T. D. Merrick, Lt. Col. S. S. Ford, Major Obed Patty, and Adjutant Robert C. Bertrand.’


Tenth Arkansas Infantry

The Tenth Arkansas Regiment was assigned to General Bowen’s Brigade, consisting of the Ninth and Tenth Arkansas, Fifth Missouri and Tenth Mississippi regiments before they were moved to Kentucky. They remained at Bowling Green until the evacuation of that place when they were placed to guard the rear on the retreat. They were then placed in Hardee’s Corps and marched to Corinth. Here the Ninth Arkansas was put in Breckenridge’s Reserve Corps and marched to Shiloh. In this battle they lost about 160 men.

After the Battle of Shiloh the regiment, as part of Beauregard’s CSA Army, withdrew back to Corinth, where they reorganized. Formal charges related to the disorganized condition of his regiment were brought against Col. Merrick. He resigned and on May 27, 1862 Captain A. R. Witt of Company “A,” “The Quitman Rifles,” was promoted to colonel and became commander of the regiment. Here their brigade was broken up.

They were moved first back of Vicksburg, where they stayed some time on the Yazoo River, at Camp Price. Then they were moved to Vicksburg, where they stayed a short while. They were placed in a brigade commanded by General Jeff Thompson and moved to Louisiana, 30 or 40 miles above New Orleans, where they spent the winter of 1862-63 guarding the New Orleans, Jackson and Great Northern Railway.

By the early spring of 1863, Beauregard’s Army, with the Tenth Arkansas was sent again to Baton Rouge where they were to prepare defenses against the approaching General N. P. Banks. This they did by felling large numbers of trees to block the roadways leading to Baton Rouge, digging trenches and mounting siege guns around the city.

By the first of March, 1863, the Tenth Arkansas Infantry was at Port Hudson, Louisiana above New Orleans and during March 7-27 as part of a CSA force under General Franklin Gardner, they were in operations against Federal forces at Port Hudson. After a series of engagements lasting into July, 1863, the Tenth Arkansas Infantry, was part of a Conderate force surrendered by Gen Gardner to Union General N. P. Banks, a surrender that was apparently helped along by internal dissension within the regiment. Certain officers of the Tenth Arkansas seemingly were able to influence some enlisted men to desert and refuse to alternate duties with their fellow companies. By July 7, just two days before the regiment capitulated, there was practically open mutiny.

On July 9, 1863 the entire regiment surrendered and became prisoners of war. The men were paroled until exchanged, with the officers imprisoned at Johnson’s Island, Ohio, in Lake Erie. The unit was eventually exchanged and returned to Arkansas. Col. A. R. Witt reorganized the unit, including some newly recruited members to form Witt’s Cavalry.

John F. Walter in his Capsule History of Arkansas Military Units gives additional information on the Tenth Arkansas Infantry and Witt’s Arkansas Cavalry.

This unit [the Tenth Arkansas Infantry] served east of the Mississippi River throughout its career. Listed below are the higher command

  • Oct. 31, 1861, Sixth Brigade, First Division, Western Department.
  • Nov. 30, 1861, Second Brigade, Fourth Division, Western Department.
  • Jan. 31, 1862, Bowen’s Brigade, Floyd’s Division, Central Army of Kentucky.
  • Feb. 22, 1862, Second Brigade, Third Division, Central Army of Kentucky, Western Department.
  • April 6, 1862, Second Brigade, Reserve Corps, Army of the Mississippi.
  • March 31, 1863, Buford’s Brigade, Third Military District, Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana.
  • April 30, 1863, Maxey’s Brigade, Third Military District, Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana.

Like almost all Civil War units, the regiment was frequently known by an alternate designation derived from the name of the unit’s commanding officer. Names of this type identified as having been used by or for the Tenth Arkansas Infantry are listed below.

  • A. R. Witt’s Infantry
  • C. M. Cargile’s Infantry
  • E. L. Vaughan’s Infantry
  • Thomas D. Merrick’s Infantry
  • S. S. Ford’s Infantry
  • Obed Patty’s Infantry
  • George A. Merrick’s Infantry
  • Zebulon Venable’s Infantry
  • Robert C. Bertrand’s Infantry

The regiment participated in the following engagements during its career:

  • Battle, Pittsburg Landing, Shiloh, Tenn. – April 6-7, 1862
  • Engagement, Baton Rouge, La. – Aug. 5, 1862
  • Operations against expedition from Pass Manchac and Ponchatuoula, La. – Sept. 13-15, 1862
  • Skirmish, Bayou Bonfonca, La. – Nov. 21, 1862
  • Operations against Port Hudson, La. – Mar. 7-27, 1863
  • Action, Plain’s Store, La. May 21, 1863
  • Siege, Port Hudson, La. May 24-July 9, 1863
  • Assault, Port Hudson, La. – May 27, 1863
  • Assault, Port Hudson, La. – June 14, 1863
  • Surrender, Port Hudson, La. – July 9, 1863

At its organization the Tenth Arkansas Infantry numbered 1000 men; yet at the close of the war there were not more than 200 men surviving.


Witt’s 10th Arkansas Cavalry

Witt’s Arkansas Cavalry, commanded by Colonel A. R. Witt, was composed primarily of men who had served with the Tenth Arkansas Infantry, been captured at Port Hudson, Louisiana, and after being exchanged, returned to Arkansas.

On numerous occasions, the unit served behind Federal lines. A Federal report indicated that it often employed female sympathizers to spy on Federal installations and troop movements, reporting the information obtained back to the command. One of these spies was reported to be operating in Little Rock in mid-November, 1864.

The unit served unattached throughout its career, with the exception of Price’s Missouri Expedition in late 1864. During this time it appears to have been attached to Fagan’s forces.

Below are the engagements in which the unit took part.

  • Skirmishes, Clear Creek and Tomahawk, Ark. – Jan. 22, 1864
  • Skirmish, Rolling Prairie, Ark. – Jan. 23, 1864
  • Skirmish, Sylamore Creek, Ark. – Jan. 23, 1864
  • Skirmishes near Burrowsville, Ark. – Jan. 23, 1864
  • Skirmish, Crooked Creek, Ark. – Feb. 5, 1864
  • Skirmish, Bayou Des Arc, Ark. – July 13-16, 1864
  • Skirmish, Gum Swamp, Ark. – July 17, 1864
  • Skirmish, Austin, Ark. – July 17, 1864
  • Operations against Expedition from Little Rock to the Little Red River, Ark. – Aug. 6-16, 1864
  • Price’s Missouri Expedition – Aug. 29-Dec. 2, 1864
  • Skirmish near Quitman, Ark. (detachment) – Sept. 2, 1864
  • Skirmish, Ironton, Mo. – Sept. 26, 1864
  • Skirmishes, Arcadia and Ironton, Mo. – Sept. 27, 1864
  • Battle, Marmiton (Charlot), Mo. – Oct. 25, 1864
  • Engagement, Mine Creek, Little Osage River, Marias des Cygnes, Kan. – Oct. 25, 1864
  • Skirmish near Lewisburg, Ark. – Feb. 12, 1865

Unlike most of the units which accompanied Price after the Missouri expedition, Witt’s Cavalry did not retreat all the way to northeastern Texas. The command remained, instead, in Arkansas, probably in order to continue its spying operations. The Third Arkansas (United States) Cavalry met and destroyed Witt’s command at the Lewisburg engagement.

The Tenth Arkansas Infantry Regiment was not the only unit which recruited men of Cleburne County. At least seven companies were raised in White County during 1861 and 1862 and others in Independence County.