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August 19 2017

Family Tree Information

I have recently updated much of the information in my database.  I have posted various versions of the database on Ancestry.com.  These are available to other researchers or family members o review.

Southern Roots – this database contains ancestors and descendants that lived in Cleburne County AR or Coosa County AL.  Many migrated to Cleburne County after the Civil War from NC, TN, and AL.  While it does contain information on my ancestors, its has many non-ancestors as well.  Approximately 20,000 individuals.  Not updated as often as the other, but for general research.

Martin-Haile Research – contains information about the Martin-Haile line.  If you are a descendant of Hubert Munsey Martin or Samuel Eugene Haile, this is the database you should use to research information.

As a starting point, I have linked to the grandparents of Janet and I.

Hubert Munsey Martin, wife Maud Ulan Cranford

Milam Harvey Parish, wife Ara Lucille Jackson

Samuel Eugene Haile, wife Gertrude P. Houston

Pious Macon Logan, wife Minnie Judith Towell

You will need to register with Ancestry to view these trees, but it is a free registration.

Additionally, I have provided here PDF copies of Ancestor Charts for the following:

February 1 2015

Coming to America

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Click on USA or Europe for a larger view

My ancestors were of basic European stock.  Coming to this country from England, Scotland, Ireland, and Germany.  Most arrived here prior to the Revolutionary War with the remainder coming soon after.  They came for a multitude of reasons, some to escape persecution, others to escape the feudal systems of Europe.   But mainly they came looking for a better life and increased opportunity.   They were hard working and industrious, mainly from the then emerging middle class (known as middlin in the British Isles).  Listed below are some of our surnames and the places of origin.


martin3.gif (2134 bytes) My Martin ancestors descended from Scots-Irish stock.   They migrated from Scotland in the early 1700’s, remaining there for a couple of generations, then coming to America from Ulster, Northern Ireland.  They arrived prior to 1750.  Originally settling in Pennsylvania, then migrating to North Carolina.

haile.gif (1936 bytes) Janet’s Haile ancestors descended from English stock.  There is even linkage to British Royalty. They emigrated to the tidewater area of Virginia.  Later generations migrated to Tennessee and finally Arkansas.

jackson.gif (2039 bytes) The Jackson’s came from England to Virginia.  They then moved into eastern Tennessee, then Arkansas and were there prior to the Civil War.

parish.gif (1916 bytes) The Parish name is of English or Irish descend.   Although originally Celts from France (Paris) most spread to England and Ireland after being defeated by the Romans.  My Parishs probably came the route of most southern English, Virginia to Tennessee, then to Arkansas after the Civil War.

kever.gif (1841 bytes) The Kever name is of German origin.  These ancestors came from Germany during the Palatine Migration. Settling first in western Pennsylvania, then migrating to North Carolina.  They followed roughly the same route as the Scots-Irish Martins.


Both the Scots-Irish emigration and the Palatine German emigration followed roughly the same course.  Many of the Germans were assisted in their migration by the British, first coming to Ireland then to America.  The most familiar landing spot was Philadelphia.  From there they traveled westward across Pennsylvania, through the Susquehanna River Valley, looking for land.

Although they traveled the same route, they seldom traveled or settled together.   In some areas one side of the river, or the road, was Scots-Irish and the other was Pennsylvania Dutch.  The Dutch (Germans) considered themselves to be more cultured and peace loving that the Scots-Irish.  The Dutch got along with their neighbors much better, especially the Native Americans, often taking them as brides.  The Scots-Irish on the other hand were much despised by the Indians.  They had a notorious reputation as great Indian fighters and were known for giving no quarter.


Both these cultures were forced ever westward and finally southward as each succeeding generation needed land.  The migration moved through the Susquehanna River Valley, then southward down the Shenendoah Valley of Virginia into North and South Carolina.  The Martins arriving prior to the Revolutionary War, the Kevers shortly after.

There Samuel Martin garnished a reputation as an Indian fighter and Revolutionary War Captain of Militia.  All this while raising a family and building a profitable farm.

There also, Jacob Kever took as his bride an American Indian woman (probably Cherokee).  The history of North Carolina  tells how it was common practice for the Pennsylvania Dutch emigrates to marry with the Native Americans in the area.  Photographs of the Kever family clearly show the Native American features.  I assume Cherokee since it was the predominant tribe in the area.

January 10 2015

Thomas Hoyle Martin

My father Thomas Hoyle Martin served with the 95th Infantry Division as a machine gunner in C Company, 1 Battalion, 377th Infantry Regiment during WWII. He joined the unit prior to deployment overseas and remained with them until their return to the US.

His first combat experience was during the  Battle of Metz, one of the most famous battles of the 95th Division and the 3rd Army, his unit was in combat for 51 continuous days before being relieved during that battle. During the month of November his battalion suffered a 70% casualty rate.  The river crossing of Operation Casanova took a heavy toll on Companies A and B and the assault of Metz further depleted Company C.  Company C suffered 57 casualties in one explosion just outside the city of Metz. All of this one month prior to his 20th birthday.

hoyle hoyle

Infantry Machine Gunner

95th Infantry Division History

Battle Reports: 95th ID, XX Corp, Third Army, Lorraine Campaign

During the Ardennes Campaign (Battle of the Bulge) the 95th ID was transferred to control of the XIX Corp and the 21st British Army Group, later to the Ninth Army.

Historical Publications

Category: Martin, WWII | LEAVE A COMMENT
April 30 2014

Captain Samuel Martin at King’s Mountain

RESEARCHER’S NOTES:

Participation of Captain Samuel Martin in the Battle of King’s Mountain.

During the latter part of August and the whole of September, Captain Martin was rarely at home, and then not remaining for more than two days at a time. About the last week of September be marched with his company by a circuitous route, under Colonel Graham, to the Cowpens. There, he united with Colonels. Campbell, Shelby, Sevier, Cleaveland and other officers and marched with them to King’s Mountain. In this battle Captain Martin acted a conspicuous part, was in the thickest of the fight, and lost six of his company. After this battle he continued on active scouting duties wherever his services were needed.

Excerpt from Sketches of Western North Carolina, Cyrus L. Hunter, 1877

Samuel Martin was born in Ireland in 1732, where he married Margaret McCurdy, and migrated to Pennsylvania. While there, he served in the old French and Indian war, removing to North Carolina, he served on the Snow campaign in 1775; on the frontiers in 1776; and went to the relief of Charleston in 1779-80. In June, 1780, he was made Captain, serving under Rutherford; and was at the capture of Rugeley ‘s Tories, and at King’s Mountain. In 1781, he opposed Cornwallis at Cowan’s Ford, and afterwards served awhile under General Pickens; and then commanded a company under Colonel William Polk at Eutaw Springs. Surviving his companion, he died in Gaston County, November twenty-sixth, 1836, at the great age of one hundred and four years.

Except from King’s Mountain and It’s Heroes, Lyman C Draper, LL.D, 1881

Then marched to Fishing Creek in pursuit of the tory officer Cunningham, out about 10 days in pursuit, the middle of August. During the latter part of August and to Ocotber, at the time of the battle of Camden (Gates defeat) and the march of Cornwallis towards Charlotte was out constantly, not being at home two days at a time. Late in September marching a circuitious route to Gilberttown, under Col Graham, where fell in with Col Campbell and Shelby, and marched to Battle of King’s Mountain where I commanded 20 men, 4 of whom were killed on the ground and 2 died shortly after.

Marched in pursuit of Cornwallis, to harrass his trains in crossing the Catawba River. Was under the command of Col Wm Graham of Tryon County. Col Campbell commanded at King’s Mountain, Col Graham having left before the action, the command of the regiment devolving on Joseph Dixon. Graham’s commission was taken away on account of his conduct on that occasion.

Declaration of Samuel Martin dated May 13, 1833, aged listed as 99 years.

I volunteered as private in declarant’s company just before the Battle of Ramseurs Mill in Tryon County (now Lincoln) and continued subject to his command until after the Battle of King’s Mountain in which I was under his command. He commanded about 20 men, 6 of whom fell. He was recognized as Capt until the end of the war. I have known him from boyhood, and have all the time lived in his neighborhood.

Statement by Andy Barry, 13 May 1833

Was with Capt Martin at Battle of King’s Mountain and many other places in Lincoln County. He was recognized as Capt from that time to the close of war. Have lived as neighbor to him ever since I was a small boy.

Statement by Samuel Caldwell, 13 May 1833

Was informed and believes Samuel Martin acted as Capt of militia at siege of Charleston. Deponent marched to Gilberttown (now Rutherford) where he found Colonels Shelby and Campbell. Capt Martin was there and marched to King’s Mountain and there commanded a company. In consequence of “Lord Wallace” army being in the neighborhood the militia was constantly out. Deponent was frequently with Capt Martin frequently on other tours and believes he served his country as he stated. Deponent has known him ever since.

Capt Samuel Caldwell – October 24th, 1833

END OF RESEARCHER’S NOTE


Historians consider the Battle of Kings Mountain to be the “turning point in the South” in America’s War for Independence. The victory of Patriots over Loyalist troops destroyed the left wing of Cornwallis’ army. The battle also effectively ended, at least temporarily, the British advance into North Carolina. Lord Cornwallis was forced to retreat from Charlotte into South Carolina to wait for reinforcements. The victory of the Overmountain Men allowed General Nathaniel Greene the opportunity to reorganize the American Army.

When British General Henry Clinton learned of his men’s defeat at Kings Mountain, he is reported to have called it “the first link of a chain of evils” that he feared might lead to the collapse of the British plans to quash the Patriot rebellion. He was right. American forces went on to defeat the British at Cowpens. A little more than a year after Kings Mountain, Washington accepted Cornwallis’s surrender at Yorktown, Virginia.

The battle, fought October 7th, 1780, proved to be the turning point in the British Southern campaign. The American Continental army suffered successive defeats at Charleston, Waxhaws, and Camden, South Carolina, in the summer of 1780. By the fall, only the voluntary militia units remained in the field to oppose the armies of Cornwallis.

To recruit and equip militia loyal to the British cause, Cornwallis sent Major Patrick Ferguson into the western Carolinas. He was to raise a loyal militia army and suppress the remaining Patriot militia. Intending to cow the Patriots, in September he sent a proclamation to the mountain settlements, telling them to lay down their arms, or he would march his army west, and “lay waste the countryside with fire and sword.”

The result was the march of the famous Overmountain men from the Sycamore Shoals of the Watauga River across the mountains in search of Ferguson. Overcoming hunger, weather, wrangling, and intrigue, the Patriots attacked and destroyed Ferguson’s Loyalists at Kings Mountain.

The Patriot army, nominally under the command of William Campbell from Virginia, contained strong leaders who managed to combine their efforts. John Sevier would go on to serve as Tennessee’s first governor. Isaac Shelby would be Kentucky’s first governor. Benjamin Cleveland would serve as a civic leader and judge in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. Joseph Winston, Joseph McDowell, Andrew Hampton, William Chronicle, and Joseph Hambright all led troops from North Carolina. William Hill, Edward Lacey, and James Williams led contingents from South Carolina. William Candler led a small group from Georgia.

Charles McDowell from North Carolina helped organize the army. But he stepped aside before the battle to preserve a united Patriot army.


PATRICK FERGUSON — KEEN RIFLEMAN

The leader of the Loyalist troops was Major Patrick Ferguson. Ferguson would be the only British regular to serve at Kings Mountain. All other soldiers were Americans — Patriot and Loyalist.

Joining the British army at age 15, Ferguson was a well known marksman and the inventor of a breechloading rifle. The son of a Scottish judge, Ferguson had an affable disposition, a gentle face and was slight of build. Nevertheless, his soldiers named him “Bulldog.”

Ferguson distinguished himself early on in his military career. Serving as a cornet in the Royal North British Dragoons, Ferguson was considered by his superiors as a courageous fighter during the wars of Flanders and Germany in the 1760’s. In 1768, he joined the Seventieth Regiment of Foot in the West Indies, where British troops engaged in guerilla warfare with the native Carib tribes. Ferguson went for garrison duty at Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1773 but soon became bored.

Ferguson’s ability with a rifle was well known. While visiting his family’s estate in Scotland before the American Revolution, he began to develop a rifle of his own. After completing the invention, Ferguson displayed the rifle for military leaders and even King George III witnessed one of Ferguson’s demonstrations.

During one demonstration, Ferguson fired at a rate of 4-6 shots per minute during pouring rain and high wind. Apparently, Ferguson only missed the target three times while firing from a distance of 200 yards — this was not possible with the British Brown Bess musket. A patent was issued and a limited number of the breechloading rifles were produced. Ferguson established an elite rifle corps which joined Sir Henry Clinton in America. Their mission: to help stop the rebellion in the colonies.

FERGUSON HAS WASHINGTON IN HIS SIGHTS

At the Battle of Brandywine (September 11, 1777), Ferguson was wounded in the arm and his rifle corps was later disbanded. The Ferguson rifles were removed and very few have been seen since. There is no evidence that the Ferguson rifle was used at the Battle of Kings Mountain.

It was at the Battle of Brandywine that Ferguson distinguished himself further though many did not know about it until the 20th century. Scholars believe that  Ferguson was the British soldier who had George Washington in his gun sight. Ferguson did not pull the trigger, saying that “it is ungentlemanly to shoot a man in the back of the head.”

Ferguson himself mentioned the incident in a letter he dictated a few months later. During the battle, he did not realize the identity of the American officer. While recuperating in the hospital from his arm injury, he discovered that the American officer in question was George Washington. Ferguson wrote that even if he had known, he would not have pulled the trigger. Ferguson’s letters are available in the library at Edinburgh University.

Ferguson later fought in the battles of Monmouth and Little Egg Harbor. He was also active in many other battles in the New York and Hudson area. Impressing his superiors with his valor, Ferguson was promoted to Major in 1779.

Late that year, he was selected to command a corps of 300 men, called the American Volunteers. The men were Loyalists, handpicked from units in the New York and New Jersey area. The corps, along with Ferguson, arrived in the South in early February 1780. Ferguson, a persuasive individual, immediately gathered support in Savannah and Augusta before Clinton ordered him to Charleston.

During the invasion of that city, Ferguson worked with the legendary Banastre Tarleton, who had angered many Patriots after his massacre of soldiers trying to surrender to him at Waxhaw. Author Washington Irving later wrote that Ferguson and Tarleton were “equally intrepid and determined but Ferguson is cooler, and more open to the impulses of humanity.” In fact, some researchers believe that Ferguson despised Tarleton’s methods.

After Charleston fell, Ferguson was appointed to the position of Inspector General of the Militia. Clinton and Cornwallis gave him the mission to organize a volunteer corps of Loyalists troops. Ferguson’s men thought highly of him — he had a natural ability to gain their affection and respect. The Scot was known for spending hours in conversations with the ordinary people around the villages and towns in South Carolina. South Carolina remained a Loyalist stronghold until the end of the war, largely due to his influence.


PRELUDE TO BATTLE

During the summer of 1780, Ferguson and his provincial corps of 150 traveled through South Carolina and into North Carolina gathering support for His Majesty’s cause. While marching through the upcountry of South Carolina, the Loyalists engaged in minor skirmishes with militia regiments. Some of those small battles happened at places like Wofford’s Iron Works, Musgrove’s Mill, Thicketty Fort, and Cedar Spring. However in August, after the Americans lost at the Battle of Camden, the Over Mountain Men retired to their homes in western North Carolina to rest before going after Ferguson again.

THE MARCH TO KINGS MOUNTAIN

Meanwhile in September, Cornwallis invaded North Carolina. His final objective was to march into Virginia. To protect his troops from guerilla attack, Cornwallis ordered Ferguson to move northward into western North Carolina before joining the main British Army in Charlotte.

In late September, Ferguson camped at Gilbert Town (near present day Rutherfordton). He sent a message to Colonel Isaac Shelby, whom he considered to be the leader of the “backwater men.” The message said that if Shelby and his men did not stop their opposition to the British, Ferguson would march his army over the mountains, hang their leaders and “lay the country waste with fire and sword.” The Patriots would have none of it.

On September 25, Patriot leaders and Colonels Charles McDowell, John Sevier, Isaac Shelby and William Campbell gathered at Sycamore Shoals on the Watauga River (near present day Tennessee). They marched five days over the snow covered mountains to the Quaker Meadows Plantation owned by McDowell’s family (in present day Morganton). There, they were joined by  more frontiersmen including those serving under Benjamin Cleveland and Joseph Winston. The troops marched toward Gilbert Town and Ferguson.

Spies told Ferguson the Patriots were on their way. Ferguson had stayed at Gilbert Town hoping to intercept another Patriot force, heading northward. Calling in reinforcements, the Scot began to march toward Charlotte to receive the protection of Cornwallis’ main army. He sent an appeal to loyal North Carolinians  — for them to save themselves from the “backwater men…a set of mongrels.” Late on October 6, Ferguson received word from his spies that the Americans were close behind him. Camping at Kings Mountain, near the North Carolina border, he sent a message to Cornwallis requesting reinforcements. “Three or four hundred good soldiers,” he wrote, “would finish the business. Something must be done soon.” Desperately short of provisions, Ferguson sent out a foraging party of 150 men. He then organized a defense and prepared to meet the enemy.

When the Patriots realized that Ferguson was not at Gilbert Town, they became determined to pursue and fight him. The soldiers followed Ferguson, leaving their weak comrades and horses at Gilbert Town. On October 6 at Cowpens in South Carolina, the Over Mountain Men were joined by 400 South Carolinians under Colonel James Williams and others. The soldiers learned from spy Joseph Kerr that Ferguson was definitely camped about 30 miles ahead in the vicinity of Kings Mountain. Shelby was especially pleased to learn that Ferguson was quoted as saying,   that he “was on Kings Mountain, that he was king of that mountain and that God Almighty and all the Rebels of hell could not drive him from it.”

The seven colonels chose Campbell as their officer of the day to carry out the plans they adopted collectively. Fearing Ferguson would escape, the colonels selected 900 of their best men to pursue the Loyalists.

The Patriots marched through the night and the next day, through pouring rain and intermittent showers. They reached Kings Mountain the next day, Saturday October 7 just after noon.

Kings Mountain is an outlying portion of the Blue Ridge Mountains. A heavily rocky and wooded area, the mountain rises 60 feet above the plain surrounding it. The campsite was supposedly an ideal place for Ferguson to camp because the mountain has a plateau at its summit. The plateau is 600 yards long and 70 feet wide at one end and 120 feet wide at the other. The Scot considered the summit too steep to be scaled.


THE BATTLE BEGINS

Upon arriving at Kings Mountain, the Patriot soldiers dismounted. After tying up the horses, the soldiers formed in a horseshoe around the base of the mountain behind their leaders, who remained on horseback.

Ferguson was right in believing that his would be attackers would expose themselves to musket fire if they attempted to scale the summit. But Ferguson did not realize his men could only fire if they went out into the open, exposing themselves to musket fire. Most of the Patriot troops were skilled hunters who routinely killed fast moving animals. On this day, Ferguson’s men would not find escape an easy task.

The fighting began around 3 p.m. when some of Ferguson’s men noticed the Patriot soldiers surrounding the mountain. After a brief skirmish, the shooting began in earnest when two of the Patriot regiments opened fire on the Loyalists simultaneously. The Loyalists fired back but the Patriots were protected by the heavily wooded area.

The regiments commanded by Colonels Isaac Shelby and William Campbell marched toward Ferguson’s men but were driven back twice by Loyalist fire. But as one regiment was driven back, another would advance. Ferguson had to shift his reserves from one place to another while continuing to take heavy losses from the concealed American sharpshooters in the trees. Eventually, other Patriot troops provided enough support that Shelby and Campbell’s regiments reached the summit.

During the battle, Patrick Ferguson commanded his men with the use of a silver whistle. Many Patriot fighters later recalled hearing the sound of Ferguson’s whistle over the sound of the rifle fire. The whistle and the checkered hunting shirt he wore over his uniform made the Scottish commander quite noticeable on the battlefield.

After nearly an hour of fighting, Ferguson suddenly fell from his horse. One foot was hanging in his stirrup — several, perhaps as many as eight bullets were in his body. Some accounts say he died before he hit the ground. Other accounts say that his men propped him against a tree, where he died. Ferguson was the only British soldier killed in the battle — all others were Americans, either Loyalist or Patriot.

Ferguson’s second in command then ordered that a white flag of surrender be hoisted.

Despite the call for surrender by the Loyalists, the Patriots could not immediately stop their men from shooting. Many Patriots remembered that the infamous Colonel Tarleton had mowed down Patriot troops at Waxhaw despite the fact that the troops were trying to surrender. Eventually, the fighting at Kings Mountain stopped.

In all, 225 Loyalists were killed, 163 were wounded, 716 were taken prisoner. 28 Patriots were killed and 68 were wounded. Among the Patriot dead: Colonel James Williams of South Carolina.


BATTLE ENDS: PATRIOTS MARCH PRISONERS TO HILLSBOROUGH

After the battle, the victorious Patriots and the captured Loyalists had to camp together. Soon it became dark and the cries of the wounded were heard and often unheeded.

The next morning, the sun came out for the first time in days. Fearing that Cornwallis would soon be upon them, many of the Patriot militia left for their homes. A contingent of Patriots took the prisoners northward to the Continental Army jurisdiction in Hillsborough.

During the journey, a number of prisoners were brutally beaten and some prisoners were hacked with swords. A number of unjust murders took place — not the Patriots finest hour. The injustices continued a week later when a committee of Patriots appointed a jury to try some of the so-called “obnoxious” Loyalists. 36 Loyalists were found guilty of breaking open houses, burning houses and killing citizens. Nine were hanged.

CORNWALLIS IS SHAKEN BY THE NEWS; WITHDRAWS INTO SOUTH CAROLINA

Cornwallis was shaken when the news of Ferguson’s defeat reached his headquarters. He remained in Charlotte a few days before withdrawing back into South Carolina to the British post at Winnsboro.

The British could not count on reinforcements from other South Carolina posts to help them — the news of victory at Kings Mountain had revived Patriot hopes. The victory triggered bonfires and street dancing in cities held by the Patriots. Soon, Patriot leaders such as Thomas Sumter, Elijah Clarke and Francis “The Swamp Fox” Marion stepped up their harassment of British troops. Patriot sympathizers increased their assaults on Tory neighbors.


COUNTDOWN TO YORKTOWN

Cornwallis was not inactive however. He sent Tarleton and a Major Wemyss in hot pursuit of Marion and Sumter. On November 9, Sumter was fully prepared when Wemyss attempted a surprise attack on his forces at Fish Dam Ford. Wemyss and 25 of his men were captured. Sumter then moved with 240 toward the British fort at Ninety Six. Tarleton stopped his pursuit of Marion and went to Fort Ninety Six. Deciding not to face Tarleton at that time, Sumter fled northward to Blackstock’s Plantation. On November 20, Tarleton attacked Sumter’s forces but to no avail. Tarleton lost 100 men while the Americans only lost three. Tarleton then rejoined Cornwallis.

Meanwhile, Clinton sent General Alexander Leslie to Virginia to prepare for battle there. Leslie was to be under the direct orders of Cornwallis. Cornwallis  ordered Leslie to come to South Carolina — he planned to resume his invasion of North Carolina as soon as Leslie arrived. Believing that Patriot leader Daniel Morgan planned to attack Fort Ninety Six, Cornwallis sent Tarleton to deal with the backwoodsman. Expecting Leslie to arrive in mid-January, Cornwallis planned to advance rapidly northward and cut off the two American armies (Nathaniel Greene’s men in the South from George Washington’s men in the North). He also hoped to stop the advance of Morgan’s forces should they survive the expected encounter with Tarleton.

Cornwallis’s hopes were dashed. Morgan’s men soundly defeated Tarleton’s Legion at the Battle of Cowpens on January 17. Morgan, who was ill with rheumatism and other ailments,  joined Greene’s army before returning to his home in Virginia. Greene saw that Cornwallis, who had left South Carolina, was getting further away from his train of supplies and provisions. Eventually, the two forces met in the Battle of Guilford Courthouse. Technically, the British won that battle but it was a Pyrrhic victory because British losses were high. One man in four was killed, wounded or captured.

Throughout the summer, skirmishes were fought across the Carolinas and Virginia. In September, the army of Cornwallis and the army of Washington met at Yorktown. After a 20-day battle, Cornwallis surrendered. The war officially ended with the signing of the Treaty of Paris two years later.

Historians agree that the battle of Kings Mountain was the beginning of the end of British rule in its former colonies. In less than one hour of battle, the Overmountain Men not only captured the day but also punctured holes in the British strategy for keeping America under its control.

Portions written by Peggy Beach, Cleveland County Public Information Officer


SUMMARY

The Battle of King’s Mountain, was a crushing defeat to the British and loyalist troops, but more importantly, brought a glimmer of hope to the Patriot forces in the South.

The war had not been going well for the American forces in the south. Banastre Tarlton with 290 of his famed dragoon legion had unmerciously butchered 400 of Bufords’ troops at the Battle of Waxhaws Creek in 1780. Burfords’ troops had tried to surrendered, but Tarlton anxious to make a name for himself, personally cut the surrender banner down, then lead the final and fatal saber charge. This lead to his nickname “Bloody Tarlton”, and his terms of surrender were known as “Tarlton’s quarter”.

In addition to the capture of Savannah, and with the surrender of Charleston, S.C., things looked bleak for the Americans in the south.

Only through the “partisans” was any resistance kept alive. Partisans were bands of guerilla fighters, whose hit and run tactics, disrupted the British communication and supply lines in the south. The famous partisans were Andrew Pickens (the Wizard Owl), Thomas Sumter (the Carolina Gamecock), and Francis Marion (the Swamp Fox).

Americans troops were all too eager to repay the British for the massacre which occurred at Waxhaws.

On October the 7th, Maj. Patrick Ferguson brings his Loyalist troops to high ground which is heavily wooded, and he mistakenly believes that this area is invulnerable to attack.

Ferguson is also noted worthy as he has also developed the first breech loading rifle, but it is not adopted as it is condsidered too unreliable. Also Ferguson is in control of the second largest group of Loyalist troops (Tarlton being first).

Ferguson with his believe that he has secued an impregnable position, as Cornwallis to send reinforcements. With his additional troops, Ferguson will strike out and crush the frontier militia which as been harrasing the British. Ferguson however makes the mistake of not securing the slopes of the hill, figuring that the heavily wooded terrain will make any type of an attack, not feasible.

Feguson has miscalculated the resolve and the practicality of the backwoodsmen. Men from modern day South Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Kentucky, hearing about Ferguson and his Loyalists, start to make a treck to this area, and destroy him before he is allowed to destroy them.

The frontiersmen slowly creep up the backside of the mountain to within yards of the British and Loyalists. Americans attack the hill for oppisite sides, and Ferguson orders a bayonet charge. The loyalists are easy targets for the woodsmen and their rifles who use the thickly  wooded cover to their advantage. The remaining men are pushed back to their camp where they are surrounded by intense fire.

Ferguson wearing a red checked shirt is easily identified, and shot no less then 6 times. Many of the others ask for surrender, but hear the response “Talton’s quarter”, and the shooting continues until most are cut down. Total causulties for the day are 157 Loyals killed 163 wounded, and 700 captured. American figures are 28 killed and 64 wounded.

This a major blow to the British in the south, and will lead Cornwallis to his next defeat, Cowpens.


ADDITIONAL READING –

PERSONAL ACCOUNTS

OVER MOUNTAIN MEN

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Dann, John C. ed. The Revolution Remembered: Eyewitness Accounts of the War for Independence. Chicago: University of Chicago, 1980.

Draper, Lyman C. Kings Mountain and its Heroes: History of the Battle of Kings Mountain, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1967.

Dupuy, R. Ernest and Trevor N. Dupuy, eds. The Compact History of the Revolutionary War, New York: Hawthorn Books, Inc., 1963

Ferguson Rifle Campaign. Page on Web Site of South Doc Productions. www.southdoc.net/tnchron/ferguson1.htm.

Florette, Henri. Kings Mountain. Garden City: Doubleday, 1950.

Garrison, Webb. Great Stories of the American Revolution. Nashville, Tennessee: Rutledge Hill Press, 1990.

Gilmer, Bobby Moss. The Patriots of Kings Mountain. Blacksburg, S.C.: Scotia-Hubernia, 1990.

Guilford Courthouse National Military Park, Page on the N.C. State Library Web Site, www.statelibrary.dcr.state.nc.us

The Heritage of Cleveland County. Volume 1. The Cleveland County Historical Association. Winston-Salem, N.C.: Hunter Publishing Company, 1982.

Kelly, James C. and William C. Baker. The Sword of the Lord and Gideon: A Catalogue of Historical Objects Related to the Battle of Kings Mountain. Boone: Appalachian Consortium Press, 1980.

Kings Mountain National Military Park, Internet Web Site, www.nps.gov/kimo.

Kings Mountain National Military Park. Sights Magazine Web Site, www.sightsmag.com

Messick, Hank. Kings Mountain: The Epic of the Blue Ridge Mountain Men in the American Revolution. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1976.

Our Heritage: A History of Cleveland County. Shelby, N.C.: Shelby Star, 1976.

Pancake, John S. This Destructive War: The British Campaign in the Carolinas, 1780-1782. University of Alabama Press, 1985.

Resource and Activity Guide for Teachers. Published by the Kings Mountain National Military Park, 1995.

Scheer, George F. The Overmountain Men. Pamphlet. Available at Kings Mountain National Military Park.

Weathers, Lee B. The Living Past of Cleveland County: A History. Spartanburg, S.C.: The Reprint Company, 1956.

White, Katherine Keogh. The Kings Mountain Men: The Story of the Battle with Sketches of the American Soldiers Who Took Part. Baltimore: General Publishing Company, 1966.

April 14 2014

Royal Lineage

King Henry the First was the son of–


1. William the Conquerer, King of England r. 1066-1087. He was the son of

2. Robert I, Duke of Normandy. He was the son of

3. Judith of Brittany & Richard the Good, Duke of Normandy. Judith was a daughter of

4. Ermengarde of Anjou & Conan I, Duke of Brittany. She was a daughter of

5. Adelaide De Vermandois & Geoffrey I, Count of Anjou. She was the daughter of

6. Robert, Count of Troyes and Meaux, who was the son of

7. Herbert II, Count De Vermandois & Liegarde. He was the son of

8. Herbert I, Count De Vermandois & Bertha. He was the son of

9. Pepin, Count of Senlis, who was the son of

10. Bernard, King of Italy, the son of

11. Pepin, King of Italy, the son of

12. Charlemagne, HOLY ROMAN EMPEROR; he was the son of

13. Pepin the Short, King of the Franks, the son of

14. Charles Martel, Victor of the Battle of Tours, the son of

15. Pepin of Heristal, Mayor of the Palace in Austrasia, the son of

16. St. Begga & Duke Ansgise, Mayor of the Palace to Siegbert. She was the daughter of

17. Itta & Pepin of Landen, Mayor of the Palace in Austrasia. She was the daughter of

18. Arnoldus, Bishop of Metz, who was the son of

19. Ansbertus, Gallo-Roman Senator & Blithilde. Ansbertus was the son of

20. Tonantius, who was the son of

21. Tonantius Ferreolus, friend and relative of Sidonius Apollinaris, at Rome 469 A.D. He was the son of

22. ______ Syagrius who married Ferreolus. She was the daughter of

23. Afranius Syagrius, who was a Gallo-Roman Consul, 381 A.D.

April 13 2014

Migration of Our Ancestors

Ours is truly a diverse family.  If America is the “melting pot” we are a great example.  My father’s family is of Scots-Irish ancestry, migrating to America prior to the Revolutionary War. Finally settling in North Carolina.  There they married with descendants of Pennsylvania Dutch (Germans from the Palatine Region) and Native Americans (probably Cherokee).  My mother’s family comes from England and Ireland, emigrating to America (Virginia) prior to the Revolutionary War, and then migrating to Tennessee and eventually Arkansas.  My Parish line is also rumored to have some Cherokee blood in it.  My great grandmother Rebecca Parish was thought to be one quarter Cherokee.  My wife’s family is from England, even including some links to English royalty.  Emigrating to Virginia prior to the Revolutionary War, then on to Tennessee and finally Arkansas, after the Civil War.  My children have married persons of African-American, Hispanic, and Vietnamese ancestry.  As you can see our family is truly diverse.

martin3.gif (2134 bytes) My Martin ancestors descended from Scots-Irish stock.   They migrated from Scotland in the early 1700’s, remaining there for a couple of generations, then coming to America from Ulster, Northern Ireland.  They arrived prior to 1750.  Originally settling in Pennsylvania, then migrating to North Carolina.

haile.gif (1936 bytes) Janet’s Haile ancestors descended from English stock.  There is even linkage to British Royalty. They emigrated to the tidewater area of Virginia.  Later generations migrated to Tennessee and finally Arkansas.

jackson.gif (2039 bytes) The Jackson’s came from England to Virginia.  They then moved into eastern Tennessee, then Arkansas and were there prior to the Civil War.

parish.gif (1916 bytes) The Parish name is of English or Irish descend.   Although originally Celts from France (Paris) most spread to England and Ireland after being defeated by the Romans.  My Parishs probably came the route of most southern English, Virginia to Tennessee, then to Arkansas after the Civil War.

kever.gif (1841 bytes) The Kever name is of German origin.  These ancestors came from Germany during the Palatine Migration. Settling first in western Pennsylvania, then migrating to North Carolina.  They followed roughly the same route as the Scots-Irish Martins.

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Click on USA or Europe for a larger view

My ancestors were of basic European stock.  Coming to this country from England, Scotland, Ireland, and Germany.  Most arrived here prior to the Revolutionary War with the remainder coming soon after.  They came for a multitude of reasons, some to escape persecution, others to escape the feudal systems of Europe.   But mainly they came looking for a better life and increased opportunity.   They were hard working and industrious, mainly from the then emerging middle class (known as middlin in the British Isles).  Listed below are some of our surnames and the places of origin.

Both the Scots-Irish emigration and the Palatine German emigration followed roughly the same course.  Many of the Germans were assisted in their migration by the British, first coming to Ireland then to America.  The most familiar landing spot was Philadelphia.  From there they traveled westward across Pennsylvania, through the Susquehanna River Valley, looking for land.

Great-Valley-Road
Great Valley Road

The Great Valley Road was a product of geography and history. It followed the contours of the Appalachian Mountains from southeastern Pennsylvania to the Carolina backcountry. For centuries Native Americans used it and called it the Great Warrior’s path. During the 18th century the Road was an expanding network of paths and trails that carried thousands of white settlers down the Valley of Virginia into Kentucky, Tennessee and the Carolinas. At the same time the Road was a center of commerce, carrying goods and livestock between frontier farms and the towns that sprang up along the route. For over a century, the Great Valley Road was a vital lifeline that connected regions like western North Carolina to a larger world.

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Although they traveled the same route, they seldom traveled or settled together.   In some areas one side of the river, or the road, was Scots-Irish and the other was Pennsylvania Dutch.  The Dutch (Germans) considered themselves to be more cultured and peace loving that the Scots-Irish.  The Dutch got along with their neighbors much better, especially the Native Americans, often taking them as brides.  The Scots-Irish on the other hand were much despised by the Indians.  They had a notorious reputation as great Indian fighters and were known for giving no quarter.

Both these cultures were forced ever westward and finally southward as each succeeding generation needed land.  The migration moved through the Susquehanna River Valley, then southward down the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia into North and South Carolina.  The Martins arriving prior to the Revolutionary War, the Kevers shortly after.

There Samuel Martin garnished a reputation as an Indian fighter and Revolutionary War Captain of Militia.  All this while raising a family and building a profitable farm.

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There also, Jacob Kever took as his bride an American Indian woman (probably Cherokee).  The history of North Carolina  tells how it was common practice for the Pennsylvania Dutch emigrates to marry with the Native Americans in the area.  Photographs of the Kever family clearly show the Native American features.  I assume Cherokee since it was the predominant tribe in the area.

April 13 2014

The Royal Lineage of Janet

1. Janet M. Haile m. Tommy H. Martin, Heber Springs, AR. they have four children (surname Martin): Melissa, Tommy D., Allison, Justin. Janet Haile is the daughter of

2. Samuel Arthur Haile Heber Springs, Arkansas. Married Dorothy Logan of Tumbling Shoals, AR,  Their other children were: Samuel A. Jr, Patricia, Donna, Stephen, Michael. His father was

3. Samuel Eugene Haile b. 18 June 1890, Cleburne Co. Arkansas. Married Gertrude Houston, 1932. Died 1943. He was one of the ten children of

4. George Washingtion Haile b. 23 July 1843 in Hickman Co. Tennessee. In 1869 He married May 2, 1868 Mary Ann Turner (daughter of Elisha and Martha Turner) who was born January 1852 in Humphrey Co., Tennessee. In 1873 George brought his family to Prairie Co., Arkansas. By 1900 George was living in Cleburne County, AR. (for proof of this connection see the United States Census 1850-1900). George died 16 May 1901 at Des Arc, Arkansas. He was the son of

5. Jonathan T. Haile b. 1815 in Mecklenberg Co., Virginia. Married Mary J. McCrary, dau of Joseph and Mary (Redden) McCrary. Resided at Hickman and Humphrey Co., Tennessee. Jonathan was the last of the children of

6. Thomas Haile, Jr. who married, as his third wife, Nancy Blacketter (who was the mother of Jonathan Haile), daughter of William, in Mecklenburg Co., Virginia in1805. In addition to Jonathan, he had a son named Gatewood Haile and another named Dudley Haile, thus, it is reasonable to conject that he was the son of Thomas Haile, Sr. who married Elizabeth Gatewood the daughter of Elizabeth Dudley (per Denzil Mauldin of Valdez, Alaska, leading genealogist of the Haile Family in the U.S.A.).

7. Elizabeth Gatewood of Essex Co. Virginia, married Thomas Haile, Sr. @ 1748. (See the Gatewood Family Genealogy, p. 157). She was the daughter of

8. Elizabeth Dudley who married Thomas Gatewood before 10 Dec 1716. (See ibid, p. 156). She is mentioned in her father’s will. She was the daughter of

9. Richard Dudley named in the will of Thomas Saxe as the second son of 10. Edward Dudley born in Bristol, England and immigrated to Virginia before May 19, 1637, residing first in New Norfolk, later in York Co. where he purchased land. He was the son of

10. Robert Dudley of Bristol (for the following generations, see LIVING DESCENDANTS OF BLOOD ROYAL, Vol. 1, p. 126). He was the son of

11. Sir Robert Dudley, Knight, Collector of the Port of Newcastle,1603, Mayor of Newcastle. Sir Robert was knighted by the King James I (of the King James Bible fame). He married Anne Wood, the daughter of Christopher Wood. Sir Robert Dudley was the son of

12. John Dudley of Newcastle-on-Tyne, Northumberland. His wife was Bridget Carre, daughter of William Carre. John was the son of

13. Richard Sutton, of Yeaworth, assumed the name Dudley. He married Dorothy Sanford, daughter of Edward Sanford of Asham. Richard was the son of

14. Thomas Sutton, died 1530, married Grace Trekeld, daughter of Lancelot Trekeld, Esq., of Yeaworth. Thomas was the son of

15. Sir Edmund Sutton, Lord Dudley, died after July 6, 1483 but before 1487, married to Matilda Clifford, daughter of Thomas de Clifford, 8th Lord Clifford. Edmund was the son of

16. Sir John Sutton VI, son of Sir John Sutton V. Born Dec. 25, 1400, will probated on Aug. 17, 1487. Also known as Baron Dudley, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. Wounded at Bloreheath in 1459. Married Elizabeth Berkeley, daughter of Sir John Berkely of Beverstone

17. Sir John Sutton V, son of Sir John Sutton IV. Was Baron Dudley of Dudley castle, 1379 – 1407. Married Constance Blount, daughter of Sir Walter Blount of Barton. Constance died in 1432.

18. Sir John Sutton IV, Baron Dudley of Dudley castle married to Joan. John was the son of

19. Catherine de Stafford, married to Sir John Sutton III, Lord Dudley, son of Sir John de Sutton II, Lord Dudley of Dudley castle, of Stafford. Catherine was the daughter of

20. Margaret de Audley (i.e., Dudley), only daughter of Margaret de Clare. Married to Sir Ralph de Stafford, Earl of Stafford, fought at Crecy, a Steward of the Royal Household. She was the dau of

21. Margaret de Clare born ca 1292 and died April 13, 1342, was married April 28, 1317 to Hugh de Audley, Lord de Audley (Dudley), 8th Earl of Gloucester, Ambassador to France, 1341. Margaret was the daughter of

22. Joan Plantagenet, born in Acre 1272, died April 23, 1307. Married on April 30, 1290 to Sir Gilbert de Clare, Knight, 1243 – 1299, Earl of Clare, Hertford and Gloucester. Joan was the daughter of

23. King Edward I, 1239 – 1307. Marrried to Eleanor of Castille in 1254. This is the King who came into conflict with William Wallace, highlighted recently in the Academy Award motion picture, ³Braveheart.² He was the son of

24. King Henry III, and Eleanor of Provence; he was the son of

25. King John I, famed signer of the MAGNA CARTA. heir to the throne of

26. King Henry II & Eleanor of Aquitane; he was the son of

27. Matilda who married Geoffrey V Plantagenet, duke of Normandy; she was born to

28. King Henry I

April 13 2014

THE ORIGINS OF THE FAMILY NAMES of Paris, Parish, Parris

 

From what we read, there are basically two distinct groups of families. The older lines come from ancestors who were from Paris, and made it to England where the letter "h" was added as part of old english. The newer lines are derived as someone who came from a church or civil parish. Also, it evolved in the 17th and 18th centuries from orpans who were raised by a church parish, hence they took the last name.

Origin of the name Parish

In 1997, Elaine Parrish provided this account of the Parish name origin to us: The most informed source I have spoken to is J. M. Parish in Canada. He recommends – among others – the books: ‘The Parisii’ by Harold Ramm (this covers the arrival in Yorkshire up to Medieval times) and ‘The Conquest of Gaul’ by Julius Caesar – written about 50 A.D. In short (what Joe maintains and what was confirmed by [and added to by] several other sources):

The Parisii were a Celtic clan that lived in a place called Paris (now Paris, France). The Roman Empire was out conquering everything everywhere.They went to battle with the Parisii, but the Romans were too great in number and won. The Parisii that could, fled to an isolated strip in what is now England and from there went to what is now Ireland.

Since Parisii was an odd name and since it was a custom of the time for a last name to be simply "of [placename]", and since some wanted to blend in , etc, the name Parisii began to change. Some kept Parisii; some changed it and it became "Paris" or "de Paris" (of Paris); As they moved into Ireland, the "h" was added; variations became O’Paris, O’Parish, and Parish. Then "The Church" came along and used "Parish" to denote areas, so the second "r" was added by some so as not to be associated with the Church.

The name changes happened over many generations and was prompted by a variety of reasons (including: a desire to fit in or not stand out as different; to gain favor with or avoid conflict with "the powers that be"; or just because people were not educated and it just happened – as in census takers and tax roll compilers here change spellings).

Joe said that one "r" Parish was more common in Canada and Down Under; while the two "r" Parrish was more common in the U.S.

The European Origin of the Parish Name

According to family histories in general the name of Parish evolved from two main distinct origins. In other words, there are at least two families branches, unrelated, namely:

Of French extraction or from Paris – evolved from "de Paris", (of Paris) from the city of Paris, as a Norman French name, originally "de Paris" which translates from French into English as "of Paris", and eventually became Parish, Parys, etc. One Englishman, Matthew Paris, the English chronicler of the early part of the thirteenth century, acquired his name from his study at the University of Paris. Paris sometimes added an h to his name to make it Parish or Parrish.

Of a locality or church parish – Parish or Parrish as a name taken from locality or even a church parish. A name local in origin, persons from this branch are not necessarily French in origin as the lines which derived from Paris above. Also in the 17th and 18th centuries, the surname was occasionally bestowed on foundlings brought up at the expense of the parish…… the young person who was an orphan of the church – in the days before welfare and state aid, an orphan with no surname may have picked up the last name of Parish as being "of the Parish"

A third, less common origin of the name comes from the rare medieval given name Paris, probably a form of Patrick, but associated with the name of the Trojan prince, Paris, which has been speculatively traced to an original Illyrian form Voltuparis or Assparis "Hawk".

April 13 2014

Leonard Travis and Josephine Phillips Cranford

Leonard Travis Cranford (143) and Josephine Phillips Cranford (144) were the parents of Maud Cranford Martin. L. T. (known as “Trav”) was born in Alabama February 2, 1840 and died March 14, 1923 at his home in Wolf Bayou, Arkansas. He served four years in the Civil War and was wounded twice.

L. T. and Josephine Cranford L. T. and Josephine Cranford

Josephine was born November 17, 1853 in (Birmingham?) Alabama, died at Heber Springs, Arkansas October 24, 1946. She was thirteen years younger than her husband and experienced the Civil War as a child. She told me stories about the Union soldiers coming through her father’s farm and taking whatever they could get from them in the way of food and supplies.

I don’t know anything else about Josephine’s childhood except that it was short. They were married December 16, 1869, about a month after her sixteenth birthday! They raised nine children, Thomas, Ella (Pritchard), Mollie (Beasley), Dora (Sharp), Maud, Leonard, Oscar, Ada and Myrl (Inman).

Theirs was a farm family which meant that the whole family had to work hard. I have a brass bell that they used to call in the people working in the field for the noon meal. My mother, their grandchild, remembers getting to ring that bell when she would be visiting them as a young child with her mother.

Lorene Martin Stuart, one of their grandchildren, remembers riding a horse there when she had to stand on a stepping block to get in the saddle. She remembers the wagon shed and the apple orchard. She said there were some homemade bookshelves behind a door in the house where they must have kept a box of apples in season, as she remembers it smelled like apples.

She says their house might have been built in two stages with the two parts joined by a porch like a breezeway. There was a fireplace in each section. Where they joined, the porch had a step up and was a lot of fun for the grandchildren to run and jump on.

Lorene remembers that her favorite part of the house was Aunt Ada’s room. It was pretty, smelled of talcum powder and had her organ in it. Once when they arrived, Aunt Ada told them there were two white eyelet dresses in her room for her and Myrtle, Lorene’s sister, and the first one back there could pick the one they wanted. I wonder if their feet touched the floor on the way!!

L. T. (“Trav”) Cranford died March 14, 1923 of prostate cancer. His obituary says that he was confined to his room for thirteen months and that his many friends, family and neighbors were constantly with him and did all they could for him. Lorene remembers being at the spring when he died and hearing them mourn, “Oh, what will I do?, What shall I do?” At the funeral she remembers they sang “Oh they tell me of an unclouded day” as the storm clouds rolled overhead at the cemetery.

“Grandpa” Cranford was gone before I was born, but I remember going to their house as a child to see “Grandma Cranford” (Josephine) and seeing the big grandfather clock and a spinning wheel. By that time spinning wheels were not commonly used. A few older people had them but I don’t recall seeing anyone actually use one, so I don’t know if theirs was still functional or not.

I remember going there to a “quilting”, the only one I remember attending. The quilt’s pieces for the top had already been sewn together, placed over a layer of cotton (raised on their farm) and a lining, then attached to a quilting frame which hung from the ceiling. Friends and neighbors sat by each side of the quilt and hand sewed through two layers of fabric and the cotton on a design that had been marked on the quilt. I was probably about ten years old, but as I recall, I quilted for a little while. However, the main “contribution” of the children was to play with the other children and eat plenty of the good food prepared by the women when they would take a break from quilting.

Ada was the only one of their children who did not marry. She was a teacher for many years and taught just about everybody in the community at one time or another. When she began her career she probably had the kind of certificate people could get in those days by finishing a one-room school, going to a Normal School, and taking a test. However, she continued to add to her education in the summer and whenever she could until I believe she graduated from what was then called Arkansas State Teachers College at Conway, Arkansas.

Ada continued to live at home with her mother for many years while she taught at the Concord school, driving her little Model A coupe to school every day.

For some reason, in the early 1940’s they left the home place at Wolf Bayou and went to Heber Springs to live. I don’t know if this was because Ada could get a better job teaching at Heber Springs or if she needed more help to care for her mother. Mollie, another of Josephine’s children had been widowed many years before, and lived at Heber Springs, supporting herself by sewing. Ada and her mother moved in with Mollie, and Josephine lived there the rest of her life.

Josephine was active as long as she could be but as she gradually became more feeble physically she couldn’t walk much, so she pieced quilts. I believe she always wore long black dresses, so they would have a lot of black scraps, and I remember they would always work them into the quilt pattern. When her eyesight became poor, her stitches were not as perfect as they had been, but she continued as long as she was able.

I went to see her during her last months when she was too weak to get out of bed. Her mind was still clear and I, for some reason, asked her to tell me again about her memories of Civil War times. She was well and sweetly cared for by her two daughters until she died when she was almost 93 years old October 24, 1946.

Cranford Family

CRANFORD

The family of Leonard Travis and Josephine Phillips Cranford, about 1904.
Front, left to right; Ada, Mollie, Leonard Travis, Josephine and Merle.
Back, Dorah, Thomas, Ella, Leonard L., Maud, Oscar.

Trav and Jo, as they were called, married in Alabama. Her father had already made plans to head out for Arkansas, so the newlyweds made the trip with the rest of the family. Records show Trav’s land patent in Section 10, Healing Springs Township in 1871 joining land of his father-in-law, Reuben Phillips who patented earlier that same year. All of Trav’s children were born in Healing Springs with Wolf Bayou listed as their address. When the oldest son, Thomas, was barely eighteen he homesteaded land nearby as did the Phillips boys who were Jo Cranford’s brothers.

Sometime in the early 1900’s this family moved to Section 25 near Wolf Bayou along the southeast side of the old Cherokee Boundary Line. I think this is land that once belonged to some of the Dill and Chastain families. Trav and Jo spent the rest of their lives of this land as did their younger sons, Oscar and Leonard.

Leonard Travis Cranford (1840-1923) and Josephine Phillips Cranford (1853-1946) are buried in Oak Grove Cemetery at Wolf Bayou.

Cranford sons

Sons of Trav and Josephine Phillips Cranford
Left to right, Thomas, Leonard and Oscar Cranford.

THE L.T. “TRAV” CRANFORD HOUSE

Cranford House

L.T. and Josephine Phillips Cranford came from Alabama with her father’s family around 1870. After living a few years in the Macedonia community (Five Mile) they moved to the Wolf Bayou area. This house was on land they purchased from the Dill and Chastain families. It was just a short way south of the Longview School where some of the daughters taught at different times. It was about a mile east of Wolf Bayou and divided by the old Cherokee Boundary Line.

Trav and Jo spent the remainder of their lives here. He died Mar. 14, 1923 and she died Oct 24, 1946. They are buried at Oak Grove Cemetery. Their children were Thomas, Dora, Mollie, Maud, Leonard, Oscar, Ada and Murrel.

Cranford Women Standing in back is Wilson Mannon, seated left to right; Josephine Phillips Cranford, Fanny Phillips Mannon (wife of Wilson) and Jeanette Phillips Ward, about 1938.

April 13 2014

Correll Ancestors

Mary Ann Correll (127) was the daughter of John and Mary Correll. As early as February 5, 1778, John Correll (318) entered a claim for 350 acres of land on the waters of Dutch Buffalo Creek in what is now the China Grove section of Rowan County. Since there were a number of John Corrells it is difficult to be sure of where he was born, but probably he was one of five brothers who came from Berks County (Near Reading) Pennsylvania and all of them bought land near each other in Rowan County, N. C. in the 1790’s.

John and Mary Correll moved to nearby Iredell County late in 1793 or early in 1794. Their daughter, Mary Ann (127), was born in January of 1795.

The Rowan County Corrells were prominent in the organization of Mt. Zion German Reformed Church between China Grove and Landis in Rowan County. But the family of John Correll became tied up with Liberty Methodist Church in their community (a church seemingly situated on their land). As Mary Correll Keever’s children grew up, every one of them became members and usually they were among the leaders. Jacob Keever’s name does not appear on the rolls until just before he left with his son for Arkansas. During his wife Mary’s life he may have belonged to a German church of some kind. The Corrells continued in the area for some time, but as with many families, they eventually went to other parts of our country in search of the elusive "better life."